GENWiki

Premier IT Outsourcing and Support Services within the UK

User Tools

Site Tools

Problem, Formatting or Query -  Send Feedback

Was this page helpful?-10+1


rfc:rfc2819

Network Working Group S. Waldbusser Request for Comments: 2819 Lucent Technologies STD: 59 May 2000 Obsoletes: 1757 Category: Standards Track

       Remote Network Monitoring Management Information Base

Status of this Memo

 This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
 Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
 improvements.  Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
 Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state
 and status of this protocol.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

 Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

 This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB)
 for use with network management protocols in TCP/IP-based internets.
 In particular, it defines objects for managing remote network
 monitoring devices.
 This memo obsoletes RFC 1757. This memo extends that specification by
 documenting the RMON MIB in SMIv2 format while remaining semantically
 identical to the existing SMIv1-based MIB.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 1] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

Table of Contents

 1 The SNMP Management Framework ..............................   2
 2 Overview ...................................................   3
 2.1 Remote Network Management Goals ..........................   4
 2.2 Textual Conventions ......................................   5
 2.3 Structure of MIB .........................................   5
 2.3.1 The Ethernet Statistics Group ..........................   6
 2.3.2 The History Control Group ..............................   6
 2.3.3 The Ethernet History Group .............................   6
 2.3.4 The Alarm Group ........................................   7
 2.3.5 The Host Group .........................................   7
 2.3.6 The HostTopN Group .....................................   7
 2.3.7 The Matrix Group .......................................   7
 2.3.8 The Filter Group .......................................   7
 2.3.9 The Packet Capture Group ...............................   8
 2.3.10 The Event Group .......................................   8
 3 Control of Remote Network Monitoring Devices ...............   8
 3.1  Resource  Sharing  Among Multiple Management Stations ...   9
 3.2 Row Addition Among Multiple Management Stations ..........  10
 4 Conventions ................................................  11
 5 Definitions ................................................  12
 6 Security Considerations ....................................  94
 7 Acknowledgments ............................................  95
 8 Author's Address ...........................................  95
 9 References .................................................  95
 10 Intellectual Property .....................................  97
 11 Full Copyright Statement ..................................  98

1. The SNMP Management Framework

 The SNMP Management Framework presently consists of five major
 components:
 o  An overall architecture, described in RFC 2571 [1].
 o  Mechanisms for describing and naming objects and events for the
    purpose of management. The first version of this Structure of
    Management Information (SMI) is called SMIv1 and described in STD
    16, RFC 1155 [2], STD 16, RFC 1212 [3] and RFC 1215 [4]. The
    second version, called SMIv2, is described in STD 58, RFC 2578
    [5], RFC 2579 [6] and RFC 2580 [7].
 o  Message protocols for transferring management information. The
    first version of the SNMP message protocol is called SNMPv1 and
    described in STD 15, RFC 1157 [8]. A second version of the SNMP
    message protocol, which is not an Internet standards track
    protocol, is called SNMPv2c and described in RFC 1901 [9] and RFC

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 2] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

    1906 [10]. The third version of the message protocol is called
    SNMPv3 and described in RFC 1906 [10], RFC 2572 [11] and RFC 2574
    [12].
 o  Protocol operations for accessing management information. The
    first set of protocol operations and associated PDU formats is
    described in STD 15, RFC 1157 [8]. A second set of protocol
    operations and associated PDU formats is described in RFC 1905
    [13].
 o  A set of fundamental applications described in RFC 2573 [14] and
    the view-based access control mechanism described in RFC 2575
    [15].
 A more detailed introduction to the current SNMP Management Framework
 can be found in RFC 2570 [22].
 Managed objects are accessed via a virtual information store, termed
 the Management Information Base or MIB.  Objects in the MIB are
 defined using the mechanisms defined in the SMI.
 This memo specifies a MIB module that is compliant to the SMIv2. A
 MIB conforming to the SMIv1 can be produced through the appropriate
 translations. The resulting translated MIB must be semantically
 equivalent, except where objects or events are omitted because no
 translation is possible (use of Counter64). Some machine readable
 information in SMIv2 will be converted into textual descriptions in
 SMIv1 during the translation process.  However, this loss of machine
 readable information is not considered to change the semantics of the
 MIB.

2. Overview

 Remote network monitoring devices, often called monitors or probes,
 are instruments that exist for the purpose of managing a network.
 Often these remote probes are stand-alone devices and devote
 significant internal resources for the sole purpose of managing a
 network.  An organization may employ many of these devices, one per
 network segment, to manage its internet.  In addition, these devices
 may be used for a network management service provider to access a
 client network, often geographically remote.
 The objects defined in this document are intended as an interface
 between an RMON agent and an RMON management application and are not
 intended for direct manipulation by humans.  While some users may
 tolerate the direct display of some of these objects, few will

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 3] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

 tolerate the complexity of manually manipulating objects to
 accomplish row creation.  These functions should be handled by the
 management application.
 While most of the objects in this document are suitable for the
 management of any type of network, there are some which are specific
 to managing Ethernet networks.  These are the objects in the
 etherStatsTable, the etherHistoryTable, and some attributes of the
 filterPktStatus and capturBufferPacketStatus objects.  The design of
 this MIB allows similar objects to be defined for other network
 types.  It is intended that future versions of this document and
 additional documents will define extensions for other network types.
 There are a number of companion documents to the RMON MIB. The Token
 Ring RMON MIB [19] provides objects specific to managing Token Ring
 networks. The RMON-2 MIB [20] extends RMON by providing RMON analysis
 up to the application layer. The SMON MIB [21] extends RMON by
 providing RMON analysis for switched networks.

2.1. Remote Network Management Goals

 o  Offline Operation
      There are sometimes conditions when a management station will
      not be in constant contact with its remote monitoring devices.
      This is sometimes by design in an attempt to lower
      communications costs (especially when communicating over a WAN
      or dialup link), or by accident as network failures affect the
      communications between the management station and the probe.
      For this reason, this MIB allows a probe to be configured to
      perform diagnostics and to collect statistics continuously, even
      when communication with the management station may not be
      possible or efficient.  The probe may then attempt to notify the
      management station when an exceptional condition occurs.  Thus,
      even in circumstances where communication between management
      station and probe is not continuous, fault, performance, and
      configuration information may be continuously accumulated and
      communicated to the management station conveniently and
      efficiently.
 o  Proactive Monitoring
      Given the resources available on the monitor, it is potentially
      helpful for it continuously to run diagnostics and to log
      network performance.  The monitor is always available at the
      onset of any failure.  It can notify the management station of
      the failure and can store historical statistical information

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 4] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

      about the failure.  This historical information can be played
      back by the management station in an attempt to perform further
      diagnosis into the cause of the problem.
 o  Problem Detection and Reporting
      The monitor can be configured to recognize conditions, most
      notably error conditions, and continuously to check for them.
      When one of these conditions occurs, the event may be logged,
      and management stations may be notified in a number of ways.
 o  Value Added Data
      Because a remote monitoring device represents a network resource
      dedicated exclusively to network management functions, and
      because it is located directly on the monitored portion of the
      network, the remote network monitoring device has the
      opportunity to add significant value to the data it collects.
      For instance, by highlighting those hosts on the network that
      generate the most traffic or errors, the probe can give the
      management station precisely the information it needs to solve a
      class of problems.
 o  Multiple Managers
      An organization may have multiple management stations for
      different units of the organization, for different functions
      (e.g. engineering and operations), and in an attempt to provide
      disaster recovery.  Because environments with multiple
      management stations are common, the remote network monitoring
      device has to deal with more than own management station,
      potentially using its resources concurrently.

2.2. Textual Conventions

 Two new data types are introduced as a textual convention in this MIB
 document, OwnerString and EntryStatus.

2.3. Structure of MIB

 The objects are arranged into the following groups:
  1. ethernet statistics
  1. history control
  1. ethernet history
  1. alarm
  1. host

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 5] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

  1. hostTopN
  1. matrix
  1. filter
  1. packet capture
  1. event
 These groups are the basic unit of conformance.  If a remote
 monitoring device implements a group, then it must implement all
 objects in that group.  For example, a managed agent that implements
 the host group must implement the hostControlTable, the hostTable and
 the hostTimeTable. While this section provides an overview of
 grouping and conformance information for this MIB, the authoritative
 reference for such information is contained in the MODULE-COMPLIANCE
 and OBJECT-GROUP macros later in this MIB.
 All groups in this MIB are optional.  Implementations of this MIB
 must also implement the system group of MIB-II [16] and the IF-MIB
 [17].  MIB-II may also mandate the implementation of additional
 groups.
 These groups are defined to provide a means of assigning object
 identifiers, and to provide a method for implementors of managed
 agents to know which objects they must implement.

2.3.1. The Ethernet Statistics Group

 The ethernet statistics group contains statistics measured by the
 probe for each monitored Ethernet interface on this device.  This
 group consists of the etherStatsTable.

2.3.2. The History Control Group

 The history control group controls the periodic statistical sampling
 of data from various types of networks.  This group consists of the
 historyControlTable.

2.3.3. The Ethernet History Group

 The ethernet history group records periodic statistical samples from
 an ethernet network and stores them for later retrieval.  This group
 consists of the etherHistoryTable.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 6] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

2.3.4. The Alarm Group

 The alarm group periodically takes statistical samples from variables
 in the probe and compares them to previously configured thresholds.
 If the monitored variable crosses a threshold, an event is generated.
 A hysteresis mechanism is implemented to limit the generation of
 alarms.  This group consists of the alarmTable and requires the
 implementation of the event group.

2.3.5. The Host Group

 The host group contains statistics associated with each host
 discovered on the network.  This group discovers hosts on the network
 by keeping a list of source and destination MAC Addresses seen in
 good packets promiscuously received from the network.  This group
 consists of the hostControlTable, the hostTable, and the
 hostTimeTable.

2.3.6. The HostTopN Group

 The hostTopN group is used to prepare reports that describe the hosts
 that top a list ordered by one of their statistics.  The available
 statistics are samples of one of their base statistics over an
 interval specified by the management station.  Thus, these statistics
 are rate based.  The management station also selects how many such
 hosts are reported.  This group consists of the hostTopNControlTable
 and the hostTopNTable, and requires the implementation of the host
 group.

2.3.7. The Matrix Group

 The matrix group stores statistics for conversations between sets of
 two addresses.  As the device detects a new conversation, it creates
 a new entry in its tables.  This group consists of the
 matrixControlTable, the matrixSDTable and the matrixDSTable.

2.3.8. The Filter Group

 The filter group allows packets to be matched by a filter equation.
 These matched packets form a data stream that may be captured or may
 generate events.  This group consists of the filterTable and the
 channelTable.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 7] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

2.3.9. The Packet Capture Group

 The Packet Capture group allows packets to be captured after they
 flow through a channel.  This group consists of the
 bufferControlTable and the captureBufferTable, and requires the
 implementation of the filter group.

2.3.10. The Event Group

 The event group controls the generation and notification of events
 from this device.  This group consists of the eventTable and the
 logTable.

3. Control of Remote Network Monitoring Devices

 Due to the complex nature of the available functions in these
 devices, the functions often need user configuration.  In many cases,
 the function requires parameters to be set up for a data collection
 operation.  The operation can proceed only after these parameters are
 fully set up.
 Many functional groups in this MIB have one or more tables in which
 to set up control parameters, and one or more data tables in which to
 place the results of the operation.  The control tables are typically
 read-write in nature, while the data tables are typically read-only.
 Because the parameters in the control table often describe resulting
 data in the data table, many of the parameters can be modified only
 when the control entry is invalid.  Thus, the method for modifying
 these parameters is to invalidate the control entry, causing its
 deletion and the deletion of any associated data entries, and then
 create a new control entry with the proper parameters.  Deleting the
 control entry also gives a convenient method for reclaiming the
 resources used by the associated data.
 Some objects in this MIB provide a mechanism to execute an action on
 the remote monitoring device.  These objects may execute an action as
 a result of a change in the state of the object.  For those objects
 in this MIB, a request to set an object to the same value as it
 currently holds would thus cause no action to occur.
 To facilitate control by multiple managers, resources have to be
 shared among the managers.  These resources are typically the memory
 and computation resources that a function requires.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 8] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

3.1. Resource Sharing Among Multiple Management Stations

 When multiple management stations wish to use functions that compete
 for a finite amount of resources on a device, a method to facilitate
 this sharing of resources is required.  Potential conflicts include:
    o  Two management stations wish to simultaneously use resources
       that together would exceed the capability of the device.
    o  A management station uses a significant amount of resources for
       a long period of time.
    o  A management station uses resources and then crashes,
       forgetting to free the resources so others may use them.
 A mechanism is provided for each management station initiated
 function in this MIB to avoid these conflicts and to help resolve
 them when they occur.  Each function has a label identifying the
 initiator (owner) of the function.  This label is set by the
 initiator to provide for the following possibilities:
    o  A management station may recognize resources it owns and no
       longer needs.
    o  A network operator can find the management station that owns
       the resource and negotiate for it to be freed.
    o  A network operator may decide to unilaterally free resources
       another network operator has reserved.
    o  Upon initialization, a management station may recognize
       resources it had reserved in the past.  With this information
       it may free the resources if it no longer needs them.
 Management stations and probes should support any format of the owner
 string dictated by the local policy of the organization.  It is
 suggested that this name contain one or more of the following: IP
 address, management station name, network manager's name, location,
 or phone number.  This information will help users to share the
 resources more effectively.
 There is often default functionality that the device or the
 administrator of the probe (often the network administrator) wishes
 to set up.  The resources associated with this functionality are then
 owned by the device itself or by the network administrator, and are
 intended to be long-lived.  In this case, the device or the
 administrator will set the relevant owner object to a string starting
 with 'monitor'.  Indiscriminate modification of the monitor-owned
 configuration by network management stations is discouraged.  In
 fact, a network management station should only modify these objects
 under the direction of the administrator of the probe.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 9] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

 Resources on a probe are scarce and are typically allocated when
 control rows are created by an application.  Since many applications
 may be using a probe simultaneously, indiscriminate allocation of
 resources to particular applications is very likely to cause resource
 shortages in the probe.
 When a network management station wishes to utilize a function in a
 monitor, it is encouraged to first scan the control table of that
 function to find an instance with similar parameters to share.  This
 is especially true for those instances owned by the monitor, which
 can be assumed to change infrequently.  If a management station
 decides to share an instance owned by another management station, it
 should understand that the management station that owns the instance
 may indiscriminately modify or delete it.
 It should be noted that a management application should have the most
 trust in a monitor-owned row because it should be changed very
 infrequently.  A row owned by the management application is less
 long-lived because a network administrator is more likely to re-
 assign resources from a row that is in use by one user than from a
 monitor-owned row that is potentially in use by many users.  A row
 owned by another application would be even less long-lived because
 the other application may delete or modify that row completely at its
 discretion.

3.2. Row Addition Among Multiple Management Stations

 The addition of new rows is achieved using the method described in
 RFC 1905 [13].  In this MIB, rows are often added to a table in order
 to configure a function.  This configuration usually involves
 parameters that control the operation of the function.  The agent
 must check these parameters to make sure they are appropriate given
 restrictions defined in this MIB as well as any implementation
 specific restrictions such as lack of resources.  The agent
 implementor may be confused as to when to check these parameters and
 when to signal to the management station that the parameters are
 invalid.  There are two opportunities:
    o  When the management station sets each parameter object.
    o  When the management station sets the entry status object to
       valid.
 If the latter is chosen, it would be unclear to the management
 station which of the several parameters was invalid and caused the
 badValue error to be emitted.  Thus, wherever possible, the
 implementor should choose the former as it will provide more
 information to the management station.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 10] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

 A problem can arise when multiple management stations attempt to set
 configuration information simultaneously using SNMP.  When this
 involves the addition of a new conceptual row in the same control
 table, the managers may collide, attempting to create the same entry.
 To guard against these collisions, each such control entry contains a
 status object with special semantics that help to arbitrate among the
 managers.  If an attempt is made with the row addition mechanism to
 create such a status object and that object already exists, an error
 is returned.  When more than one manager simultaneously attempts to
 create the same conceptual row, only the first can succeed.  The
 others will receive an error.
 When a manager wishes to create a new control entry, it needs to
 choose an index for that row.  It may choose this index in a variety
 of ways, hopefully minimizing the chances that the index is in use by
 another manager.  If the index is in use, the mechanism mentioned
 previously will guard against collisions.  Examples of schemes to
 choose index values include random selection or scanning the control
 table looking for the first unused index.  Because index values may
 be any valid value in the range and they are chosen by the manager,
 the agent must allow a row to be created with any unused index value
 if it has the resources to create a new row.
 Some tables in this MIB reference other tables within this MIB.  When
 creating or deleting entries in these tables, it is generally
 allowable for dangling references to exist.  There is no defined
 order for creating or deleting entries in these tables.

4. Conventions

 The following conventions are used throughout the RMON MIB and its
 companion documents.
 Good Packets
 Good packets are error-free packets that have a valid frame length.
 For example, on Ethernet, good packets are error-free packets that
 are between 64 octets long and 1518 octets long.  They follow the
 form defined in IEEE 802.3 section 3.2.all.
 Bad Packets
 Bad packets are packets that have proper framing and are therefore
 recognized as packets, but contain errors within the packet or have
 an invalid length.  For example, on Ethernet, bad packets have a
 valid preamble and SFD, but have a bad CRC, or are either shorter
 than 64 octets or longer than 1518 octets.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 11] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

5. Definitions

RMON-MIB DEFINITIONS ::= BEGIN

   IMPORTS
       MODULE-IDENTITY, OBJECT-TYPE, OBJECT-IDENTITY,
       NOTIFICATION-TYPE, mib-2, Counter32,
       Integer32, TimeTicks                   FROM SNMPv2-SMI
       TEXTUAL-CONVENTION, DisplayString      FROM SNMPv2-TC
       MODULE-COMPLIANCE, OBJECT-GROUP,
       NOTIFICATION-GROUP                     FROM SNMPv2-CONF;

– Remote Network Monitoring MIB

rmonMibModule MODULE-IDENTITY

   LAST-UPDATED "200005110000Z"  -- 11 May, 2000
   ORGANIZATION "IETF RMON MIB Working Group"
   CONTACT-INFO
       "Steve Waldbusser
       Phone: +1-650-948-6500
       Fax:   +1-650-745-0671
       Email: waldbusser@nextbeacon.com"
   DESCRIPTION
       "Remote network monitoring devices, often called
       monitors or probes, are instruments that exist for
       the purpose of managing a network. This MIB defines
       objects for managing remote network monitoring devices."
   REVISION "200005110000Z"    -- 11 May, 2000
   DESCRIPTION
       "Reformatted into SMIv2 format.
       This version published as RFC 2819."
   REVISION "199502010000Z" -- 1 Feb, 1995
   DESCRIPTION
       "Bug fixes, clarifications and minor changes based on
       implementation experience, published as RFC1757 [18].
       Two changes were made to object definitions:
       1) A new status bit has been defined for the
       captureBufferPacketStatus object, indicating that the
       packet order within the capture buffer may not be identical to
       the packet order as received off the wire.  This bit may only

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 12] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       be used for packets transmitted by the probe.  Older NMS
       applications can safely ignore this status bit, which might be
       used by newer agents.
       2) The packetMatch trap has been removed.  This trap was never
       actually 'approved' and was not added to this document along
       with the risingAlarm and fallingAlarm traps. The packetMatch
       trap could not be throttled, which could cause disruption of
       normal network traffic under some circumstances. An NMS should
       configure a risingAlarm threshold on the appropriate
       channelMatches instance if a trap is desired for a packetMatch
       event. Note that logging of packetMatch events is still
       supported--only trap generation for such events has been
       removed.
       In addition, several clarifications to individual object
       definitions have been added to assist agent and NMS
       implementors:
  1. global definition of 'good packets' and 'bad packets'
  1. more detailed text governing conceptual row creation and

modification

  1. instructions for probes relating to interface changes and

disruptions

  1. clarification of some ethernet counter definitions
  1. recommended formula for calculating network utilization
  1. clarification of channel and captureBuffer behavior for some

unusual conditions

  1. examples of proper instance naming for each table"
   REVISION "199111010000Z"    -- 1 Nov, 1991
   DESCRIPTION
       "The original version of this MIB, published as RFC1271."
   ::= { rmonConformance 8 }
   rmon    OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { mib-2 16 }
  1. - textual conventions

OwnerString ::= TEXTUAL-CONVENTION

   STATUS current

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 13] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   DESCRIPTION
       "This data type is used to model an administratively
       assigned name of the owner of a resource. Implementations
       must accept values composed of well-formed NVT ASCII
       sequences. In addition, implementations should accept
       values composed of well-formed UTF-8 sequences.
       It is suggested that this name contain one or more of
       the following: IP address, management station name,
       network manager's name, location, or phone number.
       In some cases the agent itself will be the owner of
       an entry.  In these cases, this string shall be set
       to a string starting with 'monitor'.
       SNMP access control is articulated entirely in terms
       of the contents of MIB views; access to a particular
       SNMP object instance depends only upon its presence
       or absence in a particular MIB view and never upon
       its value or the value of related object instances.
       Thus, objects of this type afford resolution of
       resource contention only among cooperating
       managers; they realize no access control function
       with respect to uncooperative parties."
   SYNTAX OCTET STRING (SIZE (0..127))

EntryStatus ::= TEXTUAL-CONVENTION

   STATUS current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of a table entry.
       Setting this object to the value invalid(4) has the
       effect of invalidating the corresponding entry.
       That is, it effectively disassociates the mapping
       identified with said entry.
       It is an implementation-specific matter as to whether
       the agent removes an invalidated entry from the table.
       Accordingly, management stations must be prepared to
       receive tabular information from agents that corresponds
       to entries currently not in use.  Proper
       interpretation of such entries requires examination
       of the relevant EntryStatus object.
       An existing instance of this object cannot be set to
       createRequest(2).  This object may only be set to
       createRequest(2) when this instance is created.  When
       this object is created, the agent may wish to create
       supplemental object instances with default values
       to complete a conceptual row in this table.  Because the

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 14] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       creation of these default objects is entirely at the option
       of the agent, the manager must not assume that any will be
       created, but may make use of any that are created.
       Immediately after completing the create operation, the agent
       must set this object to underCreation(3).
       When in the underCreation(3) state, an entry is allowed to
       exist in a possibly incomplete, possibly inconsistent state,
       usually to allow it to be modified in multiple PDUs.  When in
       this state, an entry is not fully active.
       Entries shall exist in the underCreation(3) state until
       the management station is finished configuring the entry
       and sets this object to valid(1) or aborts, setting this
       object to invalid(4).  If the agent determines that an
       entry has been in the underCreation(3) state for an
       abnormally long time, it may decide that the management
       station has crashed.  If the agent makes this decision,
       it may set this object to invalid(4) to reclaim the
       entry.  A prudent agent will understand that the
       management station may need to wait for human input
       and will allow for that possibility in its
       determination of this abnormally long period.
       An entry in the valid(1) state is fully configured and
       consistent and fully represents the configuration or
       operation such a row is intended to represent.  For
       example, it could be a statistical function that is
       configured and active, or a filter that is available
       in the list of filters processed by the packet capture
       process.
       A manager is restricted to changing the state of an entry in
       the following ways:
            To:       valid  createRequest  underCreation  invalid
       From:
       valid             OK             NO             OK       OK
       createRequest    N/A            N/A            N/A      N/A
       underCreation     OK             NO             OK       OK
       invalid           NO             NO             NO       OK
       nonExistent       NO             OK             NO       OK
       In the table above, it is not applicable to move the state
       from the createRequest state to any other state because the
       manager will never find the variable in that state.  The
       nonExistent state is not a value of the enumeration, rather
       it means that the entryStatus variable does not exist at all.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 15] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       An agent may allow an entryStatus variable to change state in
       additional ways, so long as the semantics of the states are
       followed.  This allowance is made to ease the implementation of
       the agent and is made despite the fact that managers should
       never exercise these additional state transitions."
   SYNTAX INTEGER {
              valid(1),
              createRequest(2),
              underCreation(3),
              invalid(4)
          }
   statistics        OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmon 1 }
   history           OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmon 2 }
   alarm             OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmon 3 }
   hosts             OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmon 4 }
   hostTopN          OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmon 5 }
   matrix            OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmon 6 }
   filter            OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmon 7 }
   capture           OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmon 8 }
   event             OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmon 9 }
   rmonConformance   OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmon 20 }

– The Ethernet Statistics Group – – Implementation of the Ethernet Statistics group is optional. – Consult the MODULE-COMPLIANCE macro for the authoritative – conformance information for this MIB. – – The ethernet statistics group contains statistics measured by the – probe for each monitored interface on this device. These – statistics take the form of free running counters that start from – zero when a valid entry is created. – – This group currently has statistics defined only for – Ethernet interfaces. Each etherStatsEntry contains statistics – for one Ethernet interface. The probe must create one – etherStats entry for each monitored Ethernet interface – on the device.

etherStatsTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF EtherStatsEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of Ethernet statistics entries."
   ::= { statistics 1 }

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 16] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

etherStatsEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EtherStatsEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A collection of statistics kept for a particular
       Ethernet interface.  As an example, an instance of the
       etherStatsPkts object might be named etherStatsPkts.1"
   INDEX { etherStatsIndex }
   ::= { etherStatsTable 1 }

EtherStatsEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   etherStatsIndex                    Integer32,
   etherStatsDataSource               OBJECT IDENTIFIER,
   etherStatsDropEvents               Counter32,
   etherStatsOctets                   Counter32,
   etherStatsPkts                     Counter32,
   etherStatsBroadcastPkts            Counter32,
   etherStatsMulticastPkts            Counter32,
   etherStatsCRCAlignErrors           Counter32,
   etherStatsUndersizePkts            Counter32,
   etherStatsOversizePkts             Counter32,
   etherStatsFragments                Counter32,
   etherStatsJabbers                  Counter32,
   etherStatsCollisions               Counter32,
   etherStatsPkts64Octets             Counter32,
   etherStatsPkts65to127Octets        Counter32,
   etherStatsPkts128to255Octets       Counter32,
   etherStatsPkts256to511Octets       Counter32,
   etherStatsPkts512to1023Octets      Counter32,
   etherStatsPkts1024to1518Octets     Counter32,
   etherStatsOwner                    OwnerString,
   etherStatsStatus                   EntryStatus

}

etherStatsIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of this object uniquely identifies this
       etherStats entry."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 1 }

etherStatsDataSource OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OBJECT IDENTIFIER
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 17] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   DESCRIPTION
       "This object identifies the source of the data that
       this etherStats entry is configured to analyze.  This
       source can be any ethernet interface on this device.
       In order to identify a particular interface, this object
       shall identify the instance of the ifIndex object,
       defined in RFC 2233 [17], for the desired interface.
       For example, if an entry were to receive data from
       interface #1, this object would be set to ifIndex.1.
       The statistics in this group reflect all packets
       on the local network segment attached to the identified
       interface.
       An agent may or may not be able to tell if fundamental
       changes to the media of the interface have occurred and
       necessitate an invalidation of this entry.  For example, a
       hot-pluggable ethernet card could be pulled out and replaced
       by a token-ring card.  In such a case, if the agent has such
       knowledge of the change, it is recommended that it
       invalidate this entry.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       etherStatsStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 2 }

etherStatsDropEvents OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of events in which packets
       were dropped by the probe due to lack of resources.
       Note that this number is not necessarily the number of
       packets dropped; it is just the number of times this
       condition has been detected."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 3 }

etherStatsOctets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of octets of data (including
       those in bad packets) received on the
       network (excluding framing bits but including
       FCS octets).

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 18] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       This object can be used as a reasonable estimate of
       10-Megabit ethernet utilization.  If greater precision is
       desired, the etherStatsPkts and etherStatsOctets objects
       should be sampled before and after a common interval.  The
       differences in the sampled values are Pkts and Octets,
       respectively, and the number of seconds in the interval is
       Interval.  These values are used to calculate the Utilization
       as follows:
                        Pkts * (9.6 + 6.4) + (Octets * .8)
        Utilization = -------------------------------------
                                Interval * 10,000
       The result of this equation is the value Utilization which
       is the percent utilization of the ethernet segment on a
       scale of 0 to 100 percent."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 4 }

etherStatsPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets (including bad packets,
       broadcast packets, and multicast packets) received."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 5 }

etherStatsBroadcastPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of good packets received that were
       directed to the broadcast address.  Note that this
       does not include multicast packets."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 6 }

etherStatsMulticastPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of good packets received that were
       directed to a multicast address.  Note that this number
       does not include packets directed to the broadcast

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 19] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       address."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 7 }

etherStatsCRCAlignErrors OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets received that
       had a length (excluding framing bits, but
       including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518
       octets, inclusive, but had either a bad
       Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral
       number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with
       a non-integral number of octets (Alignment Error)."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 8 }

etherStatsUndersizePkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets received that were
       less than 64 octets long (excluding framing bits,
       but including FCS octets) and were otherwise well
       formed."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 9 }

etherStatsOversizePkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets received that were
       longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits,
       but including FCS octets) and were otherwise
       well formed."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 10 }

etherStatsFragments OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 20] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       "The total number of packets received that were less than
       64 octets in length (excluding framing bits but including
       FCS octets) and had either a bad Frame Check Sequence
       (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a
       bad FCS with a non-integral number of octets (Alignment
       Error).
       Note that it is entirely normal for etherStatsFragments to
       increment.  This is because it counts both runts (which are
       normal occurrences due to collisions) and noise hits."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 11 }

etherStatsJabbers OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets received that were
       longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits,
       but including FCS octets), and had either a bad
       Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number
       of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a non-integral
       number of octets (Alignment Error).
       Note that this definition of jabber is different
       than the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5
       (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2).  These
       documents define jabber as the condition where any
       packet exceeds 20 ms.  The allowed range to detect
       jabber is between 20 ms and 150 ms."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 12 }

etherStatsCollisions OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Collisions"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The best estimate of the total number of collisions
       on this Ethernet segment.
       The value returned will depend on the location of the
       RMON probe. Section 8.2.1.3 (10BASE-5) and section
       10.3.1.3 (10BASE-2) of IEEE standard 802.3 states that a
       station must detect a collision, in the receive mode, if
       three or more stations are transmitting simultaneously.  A
       repeater port must detect a collision when two or more

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 21] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       stations are transmitting simultaneously.  Thus a probe
       placed on a repeater port could record more collisions
       than a probe connected to a station on the same segment
       would.
       Probe location plays a much smaller role when considering
       10BASE-T.  14.2.1.4 (10BASE-T) of IEEE standard 802.3
       defines a collision as the simultaneous presence of signals
       on the DO and RD circuits (transmitting and receiving
       at the same time).  A 10BASE-T station can only detect
       collisions when it is transmitting.  Thus probes placed on
       a station and a repeater, should report the same number of
       collisions.
       Note also that an RMON probe inside a repeater should
       ideally report collisions between the repeater and one or
       more other hosts (transmit collisions as defined by IEEE
       802.3k) plus receiver collisions observed on any coax
       segments to which the repeater is connected."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 13 }

etherStatsPkts64Octets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets (including bad
       packets) received that were 64 octets in length
       (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets)."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 14 }

etherStatsPkts65to127Octets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets (including bad
       packets) received that were between
       65 and 127 octets in length inclusive
       (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets)."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 15 }

etherStatsPkts128to255Octets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 22] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets (including bad
       packets) received that were between
       128 and 255 octets in length inclusive
       (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets)."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 16 }

etherStatsPkts256to511Octets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets (including bad
       packets) received that were between
       256 and 511 octets in length inclusive
       (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets)."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 17 }

etherStatsPkts512to1023Octets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets (including bad
       packets) received that were between
       512 and 1023 octets in length inclusive
       (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets)."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 18 }

etherStatsPkts1024to1518Octets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets (including bad
       packets) received that were between
       1024 and 1518 octets in length inclusive
       (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets)."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 19 }

etherStatsOwner OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OwnerString
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 23] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   DESCRIPTION
       "The entity that configured this entry and is therefore
       using the resources assigned to it."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 20 }

etherStatsStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EntryStatus
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of this etherStats entry."
   ::= { etherStatsEntry 21 }

– The History Control Group

– Implementation of the History Control group is optional. – Consult the MODULE-COMPLIANCE macro for the authoritative – conformance information for this MIB. – – The history control group controls the periodic statistical – sampling of data from various types of networks. The – historyControlTable stores configuration entries that each – define an interface, polling period, and other parameters. – Once samples are taken, their data is stored in an entry – in a media-specific table. Each such entry defines one – sample, and is associated with the historyControlEntry that – caused the sample to be taken. Each counter in the – etherHistoryEntry counts the same event as its similarly-named – counterpart in the etherStatsEntry, except that each value here – is a cumulative sum during a sampling period. – – If the probe keeps track of the time of day, it should start – the first sample of the history at a time such that – when the next hour of the day begins, a sample is – started at that instant. This tends to make more – user-friendly reports, and enables comparison of reports – from different probes that have relatively accurate time – of day. – – The probe is encouraged to add two history control entries – per monitored interface upon initialization that describe a short – term and a long term polling period. Suggested parameters are 30 – seconds for the short term polling period and 30 minutes for – the long term period.

historyControlTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF HistoryControlEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 24] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of history control entries."
   ::= { history 1 }

historyControlEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     HistoryControlEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of parameters that set up a periodic sampling of
       statistics.  As an example, an instance of the
       historyControlInterval object might be named
       historyControlInterval.2"
   INDEX { historyControlIndex }
   ::= { historyControlTable 1 }

HistoryControlEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   historyControlIndex             Integer32,
   historyControlDataSource        OBJECT IDENTIFIER,
   historyControlBucketsRequested  Integer32,
   historyControlBucketsGranted    Integer32,
   historyControlInterval          Integer32,
   historyControlOwner             OwnerString,
   historyControlStatus            EntryStatus

}

historyControlIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry in the
       historyControl table.  Each such entry defines a
       set of samples at a particular interval for an
       interface on the device."
   ::= { historyControlEntry 1 }

historyControlDataSource OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OBJECT IDENTIFIER
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "This object identifies the source of the data for
       which historical data was collected and
       placed in a media-specific table on behalf of this
       historyControlEntry.  This source can be any
       interface on this device.  In order to identify

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 25] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       a particular interface, this object shall identify
       the instance of the ifIndex object, defined
       in  RFC 2233 [17], for the desired interface.
       For example, if an entry were to receive data from
       interface #1, this object would be set to ifIndex.1.
       The statistics in this group reflect all packets
       on the local network segment attached to the identified
       interface.
       An agent may or may not be able to tell if fundamental
       changes to the media of the interface have occurred and
       necessitate an invalidation of this entry.  For example, a
       hot-pluggable ethernet card could be pulled out and replaced
       by a token-ring card.  In such a case, if the agent has such
       knowledge of the change, it is recommended that it
       invalidate this entry.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       historyControlStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { historyControlEntry 2 }

historyControlBucketsRequested OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The requested number of discrete time intervals
       over which data is to be saved in the part of the
       media-specific table associated with this
       historyControlEntry.
       When this object is created or modified, the probe
       should set historyControlBucketsGranted as closely to
       this object as is possible for the particular probe
       implementation and available resources."
   DEFVAL { 50 }
   ::= { historyControlEntry 3 }

historyControlBucketsGranted OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of discrete sampling intervals
       over which data shall be saved in the part of
       the media-specific table associated with this
       historyControlEntry.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 26] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       When the associated historyControlBucketsRequested
       object is created or modified, the probe
       should set this object as closely to the requested
       value as is possible for the particular
       probe implementation and available resources.  The
       probe must not lower this value except as a result
       of a modification to the associated
       historyControlBucketsRequested object.
       There will be times when the actual number of
       buckets associated with this entry is less than
       the value of this object.  In this case, at the
       end of each sampling interval, a new bucket will
       be added to the media-specific table.
       When the number of buckets reaches the value of
       this object and a new bucket is to be added to the
       media-specific table, the oldest bucket associated
       with this historyControlEntry shall be deleted by
       the agent so that the new bucket can be added.
       When the value of this object changes to a value less
       than the current value, entries are deleted
       from the media-specific table associated with this
       historyControlEntry.  Enough of the oldest of these
       entries shall be deleted by the agent so that their
       number remains less than or equal to the new value of
       this object.
       When the value of this object changes to a value greater
       than the current value, the number of associated media-
       specific entries may be allowed to grow."
   ::= { historyControlEntry 4 }

historyControlInterval OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..3600)
   UNITS      "Seconds"
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The interval in seconds over which the data is
       sampled for each bucket in the part of the
       media-specific table associated with this
       historyControlEntry.  This interval can
       be set to any number of seconds between 1 and
       3600 (1 hour).
       Because the counters in a bucket may overflow at their

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 27] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       maximum value with no indication, a prudent manager will
       take into account the possibility of overflow in any of
       the associated counters.  It is important to consider the
       minimum time in which any counter could overflow on a
       particular media type and set the historyControlInterval
       object to a value less than this interval.  This is
       typically most important for the 'octets' counter in any
       media-specific table.  For example, on an Ethernet
       network, the etherHistoryOctets counter could overflow
       in about one hour at the Ethernet's maximum
       utilization.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       historyControlStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   DEFVAL { 1800 }
   ::= { historyControlEntry 5 }

historyControlOwner OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OwnerString
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The entity that configured this entry and is therefore
       using the resources assigned to it."
   ::= { historyControlEntry 6 }

historyControlStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EntryStatus
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of this historyControl entry.
       Each instance of the media-specific table associated
       with this historyControlEntry will be deleted by the agent
       if this historyControlEntry is not equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { historyControlEntry 7 }

– The Ethernet History Group

– Implementation of the Ethernet History group is optional. – Consult the MODULE-COMPLIANCE macro for the authoritative – conformance information for this MIB. – – The Ethernet History group records periodic statistical samples – from a network and stores them for later retrieval. – Once samples are taken, their data is stored in an entry – in a media-specific table. Each such entry defines one

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 28] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

– sample, and is associated with the historyControlEntry that – caused the sample to be taken. This group defines the – etherHistoryTable, for Ethernet networks. –

etherHistoryTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF EtherHistoryEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of Ethernet history entries."
   ::= { history 2 }

etherHistoryEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EtherHistoryEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An historical sample of Ethernet statistics on a particular
       Ethernet interface.  This sample is associated with the
       historyControlEntry which set up the parameters for
       a regular collection of these samples.  As an example, an
       instance of the etherHistoryPkts object might be named
       etherHistoryPkts.2.89"
   INDEX { etherHistoryIndex , etherHistorySampleIndex }
   ::= { etherHistoryTable 1 }

EtherHistoryEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   etherHistoryIndex                 Integer32,
   etherHistorySampleIndex           Integer32,
   etherHistoryIntervalStart         TimeTicks,
   etherHistoryDropEvents            Counter32,
   etherHistoryOctets                Counter32,
   etherHistoryPkts                  Counter32,
   etherHistoryBroadcastPkts         Counter32,
   etherHistoryMulticastPkts         Counter32,
   etherHistoryCRCAlignErrors        Counter32,
   etherHistoryUndersizePkts         Counter32,
   etherHistoryOversizePkts          Counter32,
   etherHistoryFragments             Counter32,
   etherHistoryJabbers               Counter32,
   etherHistoryCollisions            Counter32,
   etherHistoryUtilization           Integer32

}

etherHistoryIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 29] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The history of which this entry is a part.  The
       history identified by a particular value of this
       index is the same history as identified
       by the same value of historyControlIndex."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 1 }

etherHistorySampleIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..2147483647)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies the particular
       sample this entry represents among all samples
       associated with the same historyControlEntry.
       This index starts at 1 and increases by one
       as each new sample is taken."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 2 }

etherHistoryIntervalStart OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     TimeTicks
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of sysUpTime at the start of the interval
       over which this sample was measured.  If the probe
       keeps track of the time of day, it should start
       the first sample of the history at a time such that
       when the next hour of the day begins, a sample is
       started at that instant.  Note that following this
       rule may require the probe to delay collecting the
       first sample of the history, as each sample must be
       of the same interval.  Also note that the sample which
       is currently being collected is not accessible in this
       table until the end of its interval."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 3 }

etherHistoryDropEvents OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of events in which packets
       were dropped by the probe due to lack of resources
       during this sampling interval.  Note that this number
       is not necessarily the number of packets dropped, it
       is just the number of times this condition has been

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 30] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       detected."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 4 }

etherHistoryOctets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of octets of data (including
       those in bad packets) received on the
       network (excluding framing bits but including
       FCS octets)."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 5 }

etherHistoryPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of packets (including bad packets)
       received during this sampling interval."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 6 }

etherHistoryBroadcastPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of good packets received during this
       sampling interval that were directed to the
       broadcast address."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 7 }

etherHistoryMulticastPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of good packets received during this
       sampling interval that were directed to a
       multicast address.  Note that this number does not
       include packets addressed to the broadcast address."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 8 }

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 31] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

etherHistoryCRCAlignErrors OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of packets received during this
       sampling interval that had a length (excluding
       framing bits but including FCS octets) between
       64 and 1518 octets, inclusive, but had either a bad Frame
       Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets
       (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a non-integral number
       of octets (Alignment Error)."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 9 }

etherHistoryUndersizePkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of packets received during this
       sampling interval that were less than 64 octets
       long (excluding framing bits but including FCS
       octets) and were otherwise well formed."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 10 }

etherHistoryOversizePkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of packets received during this
       sampling interval that were longer than 1518
       octets (excluding framing bits but including
       FCS octets) but were otherwise well formed."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 11 }

etherHistoryFragments OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The total number of packets received during this
       sampling interval that were less than 64 octets in
       length (excluding framing bits but including FCS

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 32] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       octets) had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS)
       with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad
       FCS with a non-integral number of octets (Alignment
       Error).
       Note that it is entirely normal for etherHistoryFragments to
       increment.  This is because it counts both runts (which are
       normal occurrences due to collisions) and noise hits."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 12 }

etherHistoryJabbers OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of packets received during this
       sampling interval that were longer than 1518 octets
       (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets),
       and  had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS)
       with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or
       a bad FCS with a non-integral number of octets
       (Alignment Error).
       Note that this definition of jabber is different
       than the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5
       (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2).  These
       documents define jabber as the condition where any
       packet exceeds 20 ms.  The allowed range to detect
       jabber is between 20 ms and 150 ms."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 13 }

etherHistoryCollisions OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Collisions"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The best estimate of the total number of collisions
       on this Ethernet segment during this sampling
       interval.
       The value returned will depend on the location of the
       RMON probe. Section 8.2.1.3 (10BASE-5) and section
       10.3.1.3 (10BASE-2) of IEEE standard 802.3 states that a
       station must detect a collision, in the receive mode, if
       three or more stations are transmitting simultaneously.  A
       repeater port must detect a collision when two or more

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 33] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       stations are transmitting simultaneously.  Thus a probe
       placed on a repeater port could record more collisions
       than a probe connected to a station on the same segment
       would.
       Probe location plays a much smaller role when considering
       10BASE-T.  14.2.1.4 (10BASE-T) of IEEE standard 802.3
       defines a collision as the simultaneous presence of signals
       on the DO and RD circuits (transmitting and receiving
       at the same time).  A 10BASE-T station can only detect
       collisions when it is transmitting.  Thus probes placed on
       a station and a repeater, should report the same number of
       collisions.
       Note also that an RMON probe inside a repeater should
       ideally report collisions between the repeater and one or
       more other hosts (transmit collisions as defined by IEEE
       802.3k) plus receiver collisions observed on any coax
       segments to which the repeater is connected."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 14 }

etherHistoryUtilization OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (0..10000)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The best estimate of the mean physical layer
       network utilization on this interface during this
       sampling interval, in hundredths of a percent."
   ::= { etherHistoryEntry 15 }

– The Alarm Group

– Implementation of the Alarm group is optional. The Alarm Group – requires the implementation of the Event group. – Consult the MODULE-COMPLIANCE macro for the authoritative – conformance information for this MIB. – – The Alarm group periodically takes statistical samples from – variables in the probe and compares them to thresholds that have – been configured. The alarm table stores configuration – entries that each define a variable, polling period, and – threshold parameters. If a sample is found to cross the – threshold values, an event is generated. Only variables that – resolve to an ASN.1 primitive type of INTEGER (INTEGER, Integer32, – Counter32, Counter64, Gauge32, or TimeTicks) may be monitored in – this way. –

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 34] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

– This function has a hysteresis mechanism to limit the generation – of events. This mechanism generates one event as a threshold – is crossed in the appropriate direction. No more events are – generated for that threshold until the opposite threshold is – crossed. – – In the case of a sampling a deltaValue, a probe may implement – this mechanism with more precision if it takes a delta sample – twice per period, each time comparing the sum of the latest two – samples to the threshold. This allows the detection of threshold – crossings that span the sampling boundary. Note that this does – not require any special configuration of the threshold value. – It is suggested that probes implement this more precise algorithm.

alarmTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF AlarmEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of alarm entries."
   ::= { alarm 1 }

alarmEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     AlarmEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of parameters that set up a periodic checking
       for alarm conditions.  For example, an instance of the
       alarmValue object might be named alarmValue.8"
   INDEX { alarmIndex }
   ::= { alarmTable 1 }

AlarmEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   alarmIndex                    Integer32,
   alarmInterval                 Integer32,
   alarmVariable                 OBJECT IDENTIFIER,
   alarmSampleType               INTEGER,
   alarmValue                    Integer32,
   alarmStartupAlarm             INTEGER,
   alarmRisingThreshold          Integer32,
   alarmFallingThreshold         Integer32,
   alarmRisingEventIndex         Integer32,
   alarmFallingEventIndex        Integer32,
   alarmOwner                    OwnerString,
   alarmStatus                   EntryStatus

}

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 35] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

alarmIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry in the
       alarm table.  Each such entry defines a
       diagnostic sample at a particular interval
       for an object on the device."
   ::= { alarmEntry 1 }

alarmInterval OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Seconds"
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The interval in seconds over which the data is
       sampled and compared with the rising and falling
       thresholds.  When setting this variable, care
       should be taken in the case of deltaValue
       sampling - the interval should be set short enough
       that the sampled variable is very unlikely to
       increase or decrease by more than 2^31 - 1 during
       a single sampling interval.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       alarmStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { alarmEntry 2 }

alarmVariable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OBJECT IDENTIFIER
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The object identifier of the particular variable to be
       sampled.  Only variables that resolve to an ASN.1 primitive
       type of INTEGER (INTEGER, Integer32, Counter32, Counter64,
       Gauge, or TimeTicks) may be sampled.
       Because SNMP access control is articulated entirely
       in terms of the contents of MIB views, no access
       control mechanism exists that can restrict the value of
       this object to identify only those objects that exist
       in a particular MIB view.  Because there is thus no
       acceptable means of restricting the read access that
       could be obtained through the alarm mechanism, the
       probe must only grant write access to this object in

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 36] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       those views that have read access to all objects on
       the probe.
       During a set operation, if the supplied variable name is
       not available in the selected MIB view, a badValue error
       must be returned.  If at any time the variable name of
       an established alarmEntry is no longer available in the
       selected MIB view, the probe must change the status of
       this alarmEntry to invalid(4).
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       alarmStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { alarmEntry 3 }

alarmSampleType OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     INTEGER {
                absoluteValue(1),
                deltaValue(2)
              }
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The method of sampling the selected variable and
       calculating the value to be compared against the
       thresholds.  If the value of this object is
       absoluteValue(1), the value of the selected variable
       will be compared directly with the thresholds at the
       end of the sampling interval.  If the value of this
       object is deltaValue(2), the value of the selected
       variable at the last sample will be subtracted from
       the current value, and the difference compared with
       the thresholds.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       alarmStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { alarmEntry 4 }

alarmValue OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of the statistic during the last sampling
       period.  For example, if the sample type is deltaValue,
       this value will be the difference between the samples
       at the beginning and end of the period.  If the sample
       type is absoluteValue, this value will be the sampled
       value at the end of the period.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 37] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       This is the value that is compared with the rising and
       falling thresholds.
       The value during the current sampling period is not
       made available until the period is completed and will
       remain available until the next period completes."
   ::= { alarmEntry 5 }

alarmStartupAlarm OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     INTEGER {
                risingAlarm(1),
                fallingAlarm(2),
                risingOrFallingAlarm(3)
              }
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The alarm that may be sent when this entry is first
       set to valid.  If the first sample after this entry
       becomes valid is greater than or equal to the
       risingThreshold and alarmStartupAlarm is equal to
       risingAlarm(1) or risingOrFallingAlarm(3), then a single
       rising alarm will be generated.  If the first sample
       after this entry becomes valid is less than or equal
       to the fallingThreshold and alarmStartupAlarm is equal
       to fallingAlarm(2) or risingOrFallingAlarm(3), then a
       single falling alarm will be generated.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       alarmStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { alarmEntry 6 }

alarmRisingThreshold OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A threshold for the sampled statistic.  When the current
       sampled value is greater than or equal to this threshold,
       and the value at the last sampling interval was less than
       this threshold, a single event will be generated.
       A single event will also be generated if the first
       sample after this entry becomes valid is greater than or
       equal to this threshold and the associated
       alarmStartupAlarm is equal to risingAlarm(1) or
       risingOrFallingAlarm(3).
       After a rising event is generated, another such event

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 38] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       will not be generated until the sampled value
       falls below this threshold and reaches the
       alarmFallingThreshold.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       alarmStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { alarmEntry 7 }

alarmFallingThreshold OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A threshold for the sampled statistic.  When the current
       sampled value is less than or equal to this threshold,
       and the value at the last sampling interval was greater than
       this threshold, a single event will be generated.
       A single event will also be generated if the first
       sample after this entry becomes valid is less than or
       equal to this threshold and the associated
       alarmStartupAlarm is equal to fallingAlarm(2) or
       risingOrFallingAlarm(3).
       After a falling event is generated, another such event
       will not be generated until the sampled value
       rises above this threshold and reaches the
       alarmRisingThreshold.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       alarmStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { alarmEntry 8 }

alarmRisingEventIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (0..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The index of the eventEntry that is
       used when a rising threshold is crossed.  The
       eventEntry identified by a particular value of
       this index is the same as identified by the same value
       of the eventIndex object.  If there is no
       corresponding entry in the eventTable, then
       no association exists.  In particular, if this value
       is zero, no associated event will be generated, as
       zero is not a valid event index.
       This object may not be modified if the associated

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 39] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       alarmStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { alarmEntry 9 }

alarmFallingEventIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (0..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The index of the eventEntry that is
       used when a falling threshold is crossed.  The
       eventEntry identified by a particular value of
       this index is the same as identified by the same value
       of the eventIndex object.  If there is no
       corresponding entry in the eventTable, then
       no association exists.  In particular, if this value
       is zero, no associated event will be generated, as
       zero is not a valid event index.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       alarmStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { alarmEntry 10 }

alarmOwner OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OwnerString
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The entity that configured this entry and is therefore
       using the resources assigned to it."
   ::= { alarmEntry 11 }

alarmStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EntryStatus
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of this alarm entry."
   ::= { alarmEntry 12 }

– The Host Group

– Implementation of the Host group is optional. – Consult the MODULE-COMPLIANCE macro for the authoritative – conformance information for this MIB. – – The host group discovers new hosts on the network by – keeping a list of source and destination MAC Addresses seen – in good packets. For each of these addresses, the host group

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 40] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

– keeps a set of statistics. The hostControlTable controls – which interfaces this function is performed on, and contains – some information about the process. On behalf of each – hostControlEntry, data is collected on an interface and placed – in both the hostTable and the hostTimeTable. If the – monitoring device finds itself short of resources, it may – delete entries as needed. It is suggested that the device – delete the least recently used entries first.

– The hostTable contains entries for each address discovered on – a particular interface. Each entry contains statistical – data about that host. This table is indexed by the – MAC address of the host, through which a random access – may be achieved.

– The hostTimeTable contains data in the same format as the – hostTable, and must contain the same set of hosts, but is – indexed using hostTimeCreationOrder rather than hostAddress. – The hostTimeCreationOrder is an integer which reflects – the relative order in which a particular entry was discovered – and thus inserted into the table. As this order, and thus – the index, is among those entries currently in the table, – the index for a particular entry may change if an – (earlier) entry is deleted. Thus the association between – hostTimeCreationOrder and hostTimeEntry may be broken at – any time.

– The hostTimeTable has two important uses. The first is the – fast download of this potentially large table. Because the – index of this table runs from 1 to the size of the table, – inclusive, its values are predictable. This allows very – efficient packing of variables into SNMP PDU's and allows – a table transfer to have multiple packets outstanding. – These benefits increase transfer rates tremendously.

– The second use of the hostTimeTable is the efficient discovery – by the management station of new entries added to the table. – After the management station has downloaded the entire table, – it knows that new entries will be added immediately after the – end of the current table. It can thus detect new entries there – and retrieve them easily.

– Because the association between hostTimeCreationOrder and – hostTimeEntry may be broken at any time, the management – station must monitor the related hostControlLastDeleteTime – object. When the management station thus detects a deletion, – it must assume that any such associations have been broken, – and invalidate any it has stored locally. This includes

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 41] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

– restarting any download of the hostTimeTable that may have been – in progress, as well as rediscovering the end of the – hostTimeTable so that it may detect new entries. If the – management station does not detect the broken association, – it may continue to refer to a particular host by its – creationOrder while unwittingly retrieving the data associated – with another host entirely. If this happens while downloading – the host table, the management station may fail to download – all of the entries in the table.

hostControlTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF HostControlEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of host table control entries."
   ::= { hosts 1 }

hostControlEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     HostControlEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of parameters that set up the discovery of hosts
       on a particular interface and the collection of statistics
       about these hosts.  For example, an instance of the
       hostControlTableSize object might be named
       hostControlTableSize.1"
   INDEX { hostControlIndex }
   ::= { hostControlTable 1 }

HostControlEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   hostControlIndex            Integer32,
   hostControlDataSource       OBJECT IDENTIFIER,
   hostControlTableSize        Integer32,
   hostControlLastDeleteTime   TimeTicks,
   hostControlOwner            OwnerString,
   hostControlStatus           EntryStatus

}

hostControlIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry in the

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 42] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       hostControl table.  Each such entry defines
       a function that discovers hosts on a particular interface
       and places statistics about them in the hostTable and
       the hostTimeTable on behalf of this hostControlEntry."
   ::= { hostControlEntry 1 }

hostControlDataSource OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OBJECT IDENTIFIER
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "This object identifies the source of the data for
       this instance of the host function.  This source
       can be any interface on this device.  In order
       to identify a particular interface, this object shall
       identify the instance of the ifIndex object, defined
       in RFC 2233 [17], for the desired interface.
       For example, if an entry were to receive data from
       interface #1, this object would be set to ifIndex.1.
       The statistics in this group reflect all packets
       on the local network segment attached to the identified
       interface.
       An agent may or may not be able to tell if fundamental
       changes to the media of the interface have occurred and
       necessitate an invalidation of this entry.  For example, a
       hot-pluggable ethernet card could be pulled out and replaced
       by a token-ring card.  In such a case, if the agent has such
       knowledge of the change, it is recommended that it
       invalidate this entry.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       hostControlStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { hostControlEntry 2 }

hostControlTableSize OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of hostEntries in the hostTable and the
       hostTimeTable associated with this hostControlEntry."
   ::= { hostControlEntry 3 }

hostControlLastDeleteTime OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     TimeTicks
   MAX-ACCESS read-only

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 43] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of sysUpTime when the last entry
       was deleted from the portion of the hostTable
       associated with this hostControlEntry.  If no
       deletions have occurred, this value shall be zero."
   ::= { hostControlEntry 4 }

hostControlOwner OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OwnerString
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The entity that configured this entry and is therefore
       using the resources assigned to it."
   ::= { hostControlEntry 5 }

hostControlStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EntryStatus
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of this hostControl entry.
       If this object is not equal to valid(1), all associated
       entries in the hostTable, hostTimeTable, and the
       hostTopNTable shall be deleted by the agent."
   ::= { hostControlEntry 6 }

hostTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF HostEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of host entries."
   ::= { hosts 2 }

hostEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     HostEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A collection of statistics for a particular host that has
       been discovered on an interface of this device.  For example,
       an instance of the hostOutBroadcastPkts object might be
       named hostOutBroadcastPkts.1.6.8.0.32.27.3.176"
   INDEX { hostIndex, hostAddress }
   ::= { hostTable 1 }

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 44] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

HostEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   hostAddress             OCTET STRING,
   hostCreationOrder       Integer32,
   hostIndex               Integer32,
   hostInPkts              Counter32,
   hostOutPkts             Counter32,
   hostInOctets            Counter32,
   hostOutOctets           Counter32,
   hostOutErrors           Counter32,
   hostOutBroadcastPkts    Counter32,
   hostOutMulticastPkts    Counter32

}

hostAddress OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The physical address of this host."
   ::= { hostEntry 1 }

hostCreationOrder OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that defines the relative ordering of
       the creation time of hosts captured for a
       particular hostControlEntry.  This index shall
       be between 1 and N, where N is the value of
       the associated hostControlTableSize.  The ordering
       of the indexes is based on the order of each entry's
       insertion into the table, in which entries added earlier
       have a lower index value than entries added later.
       It is important to note that the order for a
       particular entry may change as an (earlier) entry
       is deleted from the table.  Because this order may
       change, management stations should make use of the
       hostControlLastDeleteTime variable in the
       hostControlEntry associated with the relevant
       portion of the hostTable.  By observing
       this variable, the management station may detect
       the circumstances where a previous association
       between a value of hostCreationOrder
       and a hostEntry may no longer hold."
   ::= { hostEntry 2 }

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 45] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

hostIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The set of collected host statistics of which
       this entry is a part.  The set of hosts
       identified by a particular value of this
       index is associated with the hostControlEntry
       as identified by the same value of hostControlIndex."
   ::= { hostEntry 3 }

hostInPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of good packets transmitted to this
       address since it was added to the hostTable."
   ::= { hostEntry 4 }

hostOutPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of packets, including bad packets, transmitted
       by this address since it was added to the hostTable."
   ::= { hostEntry 5 }

hostInOctets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of octets transmitted to this address since
       it was added to the hostTable (excluding framing
       bits but including FCS octets), except for those
       octets in bad packets."
   ::= { hostEntry 6 }

hostOutOctets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 46] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of octets transmitted by this address since
       it was added to the hostTable (excluding framing
       bits but including FCS octets), including those
       octets in bad packets."
   ::= { hostEntry 7 }

hostOutErrors OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of bad packets transmitted by this address
       since this host was added to the hostTable."
   ::= { hostEntry 8 }

hostOutBroadcastPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of good packets transmitted by this
       address that were directed to the broadcast address
       since this host was added to the hostTable."
   ::= { hostEntry 9 }

hostOutMulticastPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of good packets transmitted by this
       address that were directed to a multicast address
       since this host was added to the hostTable.
       Note that this number does not include packets
       directed to the broadcast address."
   ::= { hostEntry 10 }

– host Time Table

hostTimeTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF HostTimeEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 47] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of time-ordered host table entries."
   ::= { hosts 3 }

hostTimeEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     HostTimeEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A collection of statistics for a particular host that has
       been discovered on an interface of this device.  This
       collection includes the relative ordering of the creation
       time of this object.  For example, an instance of the
       hostTimeOutBroadcastPkts object might be named
       hostTimeOutBroadcastPkts.1.687"
   INDEX { hostTimeIndex, hostTimeCreationOrder }
   ::= { hostTimeTable 1 }

HostTimeEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   hostTimeAddress              OCTET STRING,
   hostTimeCreationOrder        Integer32,
   hostTimeIndex                Integer32,
   hostTimeInPkts               Counter32,
   hostTimeOutPkts              Counter32,
   hostTimeInOctets             Counter32,
   hostTimeOutOctets            Counter32,
   hostTimeOutErrors            Counter32,
   hostTimeOutBroadcastPkts     Counter32,
   hostTimeOutMulticastPkts     Counter32

}

hostTimeAddress OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The physical address of this host."
   ::= { hostTimeEntry 1 }

hostTimeCreationOrder OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry in
       the hostTime table among those entries associated
       with the same hostControlEntry.  This index shall
       be between 1 and N, where N is the value of

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 48] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       the associated hostControlTableSize.  The ordering
       of the indexes is based on the order of each entry's
       insertion into the table, in which entries added earlier
       have a lower index value than entries added later.
       Thus the management station has the ability to
       learn of new entries added to this table without
       downloading the entire table.
       It is important to note that the index for a
       particular entry may change as an (earlier) entry
       is deleted from the table.  Because this order may
       change, management stations should make use of the
       hostControlLastDeleteTime variable in the
       hostControlEntry associated with the relevant
       portion of the hostTimeTable.  By observing
       this variable, the management station may detect
       the circumstances where a download of the table
       may have missed entries, and where a previous
       association between a value of hostTimeCreationOrder
       and a hostTimeEntry may no longer hold."
   ::= { hostTimeEntry 2 }

hostTimeIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The set of collected host statistics of which
       this entry is a part.  The set of hosts
       identified by a particular value of this
       index is associated with the hostControlEntry
       as identified by the same value of hostControlIndex."
   ::= { hostTimeEntry 3 }

hostTimeInPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of good packets transmitted to this
       address since it was added to the hostTimeTable."
   ::= { hostTimeEntry 4 }

hostTimeOutPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 49] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of packets, including bad packets, transmitted
       by this address since it was added to the hostTimeTable."
   ::= { hostTimeEntry 5 }

hostTimeInOctets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of octets transmitted to this address since
       it was added to the hostTimeTable (excluding framing
       bits but including FCS octets), except for those
       octets in bad packets."
   ::= { hostTimeEntry 6 }

hostTimeOutOctets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of octets transmitted by this address since
       it was added to the hostTimeTable (excluding framing
       bits but including FCS octets), including those
       octets in bad packets."
   ::= { hostTimeEntry 7 }

hostTimeOutErrors OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of bad packets transmitted by this address
       since this host was added to the hostTimeTable."
   ::= { hostTimeEntry 8 }

hostTimeOutBroadcastPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of good packets transmitted by this
       address that were directed to the broadcast address

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 50] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       since this host was added to the hostTimeTable."
   ::= { hostTimeEntry 9 }

hostTimeOutMulticastPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of good packets transmitted by this
       address that were directed to a multicast address
       since this host was added to the hostTimeTable.
       Note that this number does not include packets directed
       to the broadcast address."
   ::= { hostTimeEntry 10 }

– The Host Top "N" Group

– Implementation of the Host Top N group is optional. The Host Top N – group requires the implementation of the host group. – Consult the MODULE-COMPLIANCE macro for the authoritative – conformance information for this MIB. – – The Host Top N group is used to prepare reports that describe – the hosts that top a list ordered by one of their statistics. – The available statistics are samples of one of their – base statistics, over an interval specified by the management – station. Thus, these statistics are rate based. The management – station also selects how many such hosts are reported.

– The hostTopNControlTable is used to initiate the generation of – such a report. The management station may select the parameters – of such a report, such as which interface, which statistic, – how many hosts, and the start and stop times of the sampling. – When the report is prepared, entries are created in the – hostTopNTable associated with the relevant hostTopNControlEntry. – These entries are static for each report after it has been – prepared.

hostTopNControlTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF HostTopNControlEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of top N host control entries."
   ::= { hostTopN 1 }

hostTopNControlEntry OBJECT-TYPE

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 51] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   SYNTAX     HostTopNControlEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A set of parameters that control the creation of a report
       of the top N hosts according to several metrics.  For
       example, an instance of the hostTopNDuration object might
       be named hostTopNDuration.3"
   INDEX { hostTopNControlIndex }
   ::= { hostTopNControlTable 1 }

HostTopNControlEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   hostTopNControlIndex    Integer32,
   hostTopNHostIndex       Integer32,
   hostTopNRateBase        INTEGER,
   hostTopNTimeRemaining   Integer32,
   hostTopNDuration        Integer32,
   hostTopNRequestedSize   Integer32,
   hostTopNGrantedSize     Integer32,
   hostTopNStartTime       TimeTicks,
   hostTopNOwner           OwnerString,
   hostTopNStatus          EntryStatus

}

hostTopNControlIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry
       in the hostTopNControl table.  Each such
       entry defines one top N report prepared for
       one interface."
   ::= { hostTopNControlEntry 1 }

hostTopNHostIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The host table for which a top N report will be prepared
       on behalf of this entry.  The host table identified by a
       particular value of this index is associated with the same
       host table as identified by the same value of
       hostIndex.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       hostTopNStatus object is equal to valid(1)."

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 52] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   ::= { hostTopNControlEntry 2 }

hostTopNRateBase OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     INTEGER {
                hostTopNInPkts(1),
                hostTopNOutPkts(2),
                hostTopNInOctets(3),
                hostTopNOutOctets(4),
                hostTopNOutErrors(5),
                hostTopNOutBroadcastPkts(6),
                hostTopNOutMulticastPkts(7)
              }
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The variable for each host that the hostTopNRate
       variable is based upon.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       hostTopNStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { hostTopNControlEntry 3 }

hostTopNTimeRemaining OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Seconds"
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of seconds left in the report currently being
       collected.  When this object is modified by the management
       station, a new collection is started, possibly aborting
       a currently running report.  The new value is used
       as the requested duration of this report, which is
       loaded into the associated hostTopNDuration object.
       When this object is set to a non-zero value, any
       associated hostTopNEntries shall be made
       inaccessible by the monitor.  While the value of this
       object is non-zero, it decrements by one per second until
       it reaches zero.  During this time, all associated
       hostTopNEntries shall remain inaccessible.  At the time
       that this object decrements to zero, the report is made
       accessible in the hostTopNTable.  Thus, the hostTopN
       table needs to be created only at the end of the collection
       interval."
   DEFVAL { 0 }
   ::= { hostTopNControlEntry 4 }

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 53] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

hostTopNDuration OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Seconds"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of seconds that this report has collected
       during the last sampling interval, or if this
       report is currently being collected, the number
       of seconds that this report is being collected
       during this sampling interval.
       When the associated hostTopNTimeRemaining object is set,
       this object shall be set by the probe to the same value
       and shall not be modified until the next time
       the hostTopNTimeRemaining is set.
       This value shall be zero if no reports have been
       requested for this hostTopNControlEntry."
   DEFVAL { 0 }
   ::= { hostTopNControlEntry 5 }

hostTopNRequestedSize OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The maximum number of hosts requested for the top N
       table.
       When this object is created or modified, the probe
       should set hostTopNGrantedSize as closely to this
       object as is possible for the particular probe
       implementation and available resources."
   DEFVAL { 10 }
   ::= { hostTopNControlEntry 6 }

hostTopNGrantedSize OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The maximum number of hosts in the top N table.
       When the associated hostTopNRequestedSize object is
       created or modified, the probe should set this
       object as closely to the requested value as is possible
       for the particular implementation and available

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 54] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       resources. The probe must not lower this value except
       as a result of a set to the associated
       hostTopNRequestedSize object.
       Hosts with the highest value of hostTopNRate shall be
       placed in this table in decreasing order of this rate
       until there is no more room or until there are no more
       hosts."
   ::= { hostTopNControlEntry 7 }

hostTopNStartTime OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     TimeTicks
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of sysUpTime when this top N report was
       last started.  In other words, this is the time that
       the associated hostTopNTimeRemaining object was
       modified to start the requested report."
   ::= { hostTopNControlEntry 8 }

hostTopNOwner OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OwnerString
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The entity that configured this entry and is therefore
       using the resources assigned to it."
   ::= { hostTopNControlEntry 9 }

hostTopNStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EntryStatus
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of this hostTopNControl entry.
       If this object is not equal to valid(1), all associated
       hostTopNEntries shall be deleted by the agent."
   ::= { hostTopNControlEntry 10 }

hostTopNTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF HostTopNEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of top N host entries."
   ::= { hostTopN 2 }

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 55] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

hostTopNEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     HostTopNEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A set of statistics for a host that is part of a top N
       report.  For example, an instance of the hostTopNRate
       object might be named hostTopNRate.3.10"
   INDEX { hostTopNReport, hostTopNIndex }
   ::= { hostTopNTable 1 }

HostTopNEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   hostTopNReport                Integer32,
   hostTopNIndex                 Integer32,
   hostTopNAddress               OCTET STRING,
   hostTopNRate                  Integer32

}

hostTopNReport OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "This object identifies the top N report of which
       this entry is a part.  The set of hosts
       identified by a particular value of this
       object is part of the same report as identified
       by the same value of the hostTopNControlIndex object."
   ::= { hostTopNEntry 1 }

hostTopNIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry in
       the hostTopN table among those in the same report.
       This index is between 1 and N, where N is the
       number of entries in this table.  Increasing values
       of hostTopNIndex shall be assigned to entries with
       decreasing values of hostTopNRate until index N
       is assigned to the entry with the lowest value of
       hostTopNRate or there are no more hostTopNEntries."
   ::= { hostTopNEntry 2 }

hostTopNAddress OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-only

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 56] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The physical address of this host."
   ::= { hostTopNEntry 3 }

hostTopNRate OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The amount of change in the selected variable
       during this sampling interval.  The selected
       variable is this host's instance of the object
       selected by hostTopNRateBase."
   ::= { hostTopNEntry 4 }

– The Matrix Group

– Implementation of the Matrix group is optional. – Consult the MODULE-COMPLIANCE macro for the authoritative – conformance information for this MIB. – – The Matrix group consists of the matrixControlTable, matrixSDTable – and the matrixDSTable. These tables store statistics for a – particular conversation between two addresses. As the device – detects a new conversation, including those to a non-unicast – address, it creates a new entry in both of the matrix tables. – It must only create new entries based on information – received in good packets. If the monitoring device finds – itself short of resources, it may delete entries as needed. – It is suggested that the device delete the least recently used – entries first.

matrixControlTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF MatrixControlEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of information entries for the
       traffic matrix on each interface."
   ::= { matrix 1 }

matrixControlEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     MatrixControlEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "Information about a traffic matrix on a particular

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 57] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       interface.  For example, an instance of the
       matrixControlLastDeleteTime object might be named
       matrixControlLastDeleteTime.1"
   INDEX { matrixControlIndex }
   ::= { matrixControlTable 1 }

MatrixControlEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   matrixControlIndex           Integer32,
   matrixControlDataSource      OBJECT IDENTIFIER,
   matrixControlTableSize       Integer32,
   matrixControlLastDeleteTime  TimeTicks,
   matrixControlOwner           OwnerString,
   matrixControlStatus          EntryStatus

}

matrixControlIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry in the
       matrixControl table.  Each such entry defines
       a function that discovers conversations on a particular
       interface and places statistics about them in the
       matrixSDTable and the matrixDSTable on behalf of this
       matrixControlEntry."
   ::= { matrixControlEntry 1 }

matrixControlDataSource OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OBJECT IDENTIFIER
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "This object identifies the source of
       the data from which this entry creates a traffic matrix.
       This source can be any interface on this device.  In
       order to identify a particular interface, this object
       shall identify the instance of the ifIndex object,
       defined in RFC 2233 [17], for the desired
       interface.  For example, if an entry were to receive data
       from interface #1, this object would be set to ifIndex.1.
       The statistics in this group reflect all packets
       on the local network segment attached to the identified
       interface.
       An agent may or may not be able to tell if fundamental
       changes to the media of the interface have occurred and

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 58] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       necessitate an invalidation of this entry.  For example, a
       hot-pluggable ethernet card could be pulled out and replaced
       by a token-ring card.  In such a case, if the agent has such
       knowledge of the change, it is recommended that it
       invalidate this entry.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       matrixControlStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { matrixControlEntry 2 }

matrixControlTableSize OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of matrixSDEntries in the matrixSDTable
       for this interface.  This must also be the value of
       the number of entries in the matrixDSTable for this
       interface."
   ::= { matrixControlEntry 3 }

matrixControlLastDeleteTime OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     TimeTicks
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of sysUpTime when the last entry
       was deleted from the portion of the matrixSDTable
       or matrixDSTable associated with this matrixControlEntry.
       If no deletions have occurred, this value shall be
       zero."
   ::= { matrixControlEntry 4 }

matrixControlOwner OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OwnerString
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The entity that configured this entry and is therefore
       using the resources assigned to it."
   ::= { matrixControlEntry 5 }

matrixControlStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EntryStatus
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of this matrixControl entry.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 59] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       If this object is not equal to valid(1), all associated
       entries in the matrixSDTable and the matrixDSTable
       shall be deleted by the agent."
   ::= { matrixControlEntry 6 }

matrixSDTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF MatrixSDEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of traffic matrix entries indexed by
       source and destination MAC address."
   ::= { matrix 2 }

matrixSDEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     MatrixSDEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A collection of statistics for communications between
       two addresses on a particular interface.  For example,
       an instance of the matrixSDPkts object might be named
       matrixSDPkts.1.6.8.0.32.27.3.176.6.8.0.32.10.8.113"
   INDEX { matrixSDIndex,
           matrixSDSourceAddress, matrixSDDestAddress }
   ::= { matrixSDTable 1 }

MatrixSDEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   matrixSDSourceAddress       OCTET STRING,
   matrixSDDestAddress         OCTET STRING,
   matrixSDIndex               Integer32,
   matrixSDPkts                Counter32,
   matrixSDOctets              Counter32,
   matrixSDErrors              Counter32

}

matrixSDSourceAddress OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The source physical address."
   ::= { matrixSDEntry 1 }

matrixSDDestAddress OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 60] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   DESCRIPTION
       "The destination physical address."
   ::= { matrixSDEntry 2 }

matrixSDIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The set of collected matrix statistics of which
       this entry is a part.  The set of matrix statistics
       identified by a particular value of this index
       is associated with the same matrixControlEntry
       as identified by the same value of matrixControlIndex."
   ::= { matrixSDEntry 3 }

matrixSDPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of packets transmitted from the source
       address to the destination address (this number includes
       bad packets)."
   ::= { matrixSDEntry 4 }

matrixSDOctets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of octets (excluding framing bits but
       including FCS octets) contained in all packets
       transmitted from the source address to the
       destination address."
   ::= { matrixSDEntry 5 }

matrixSDErrors OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of bad packets transmitted from
       the source address to the destination address."
   ::= { matrixSDEntry 6 }

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 61] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

– Traffic matrix tables from destination to source

matrixDSTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF MatrixDSEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of traffic matrix entries indexed by
       destination and source MAC address."
   ::= { matrix 3 }

matrixDSEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     MatrixDSEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A collection of statistics for communications between
       two addresses on a particular interface.  For example,
       an instance of the matrixSDPkts object might be named
       matrixSDPkts.1.6.8.0.32.10.8.113.6.8.0.32.27.3.176"
   INDEX { matrixDSIndex,
           matrixDSDestAddress, matrixDSSourceAddress }
   ::= { matrixDSTable 1 }

MatrixDSEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   matrixDSSourceAddress       OCTET STRING,
   matrixDSDestAddress         OCTET STRING,
   matrixDSIndex               Integer32,
   matrixDSPkts                Counter32,
   matrixDSOctets              Counter32,
   matrixDSErrors              Counter32

}

matrixDSSourceAddress OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The source physical address."
   ::= { matrixDSEntry 1 }

matrixDSDestAddress OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The destination physical address."
   ::= { matrixDSEntry 2 }

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 62] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

matrixDSIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The set of collected matrix statistics of which
       this entry is a part.  The set of matrix statistics
       identified by a particular value of this index
       is associated with the same matrixControlEntry
       as identified by the same value of matrixControlIndex."
   ::= { matrixDSEntry 3 }

matrixDSPkts OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of packets transmitted from the source
       address to the destination address (this number includes
       bad packets)."
   ::= { matrixDSEntry 4 }

matrixDSOctets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of octets (excluding framing bits
       but including FCS octets) contained in all packets
       transmitted from the source address to the
       destination address."
   ::= { matrixDSEntry 5 }

matrixDSErrors OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of bad packets transmitted from
       the source address to the destination address."
   ::= { matrixDSEntry 6 }

– The Filter Group

– Implementation of the Filter group is optional.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 63] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

– Consult the MODULE-COMPLIANCE macro for the authoritative – conformance information for this MIB. – – The Filter group allows packets to be captured with an – arbitrary filter expression. A logical data and – event stream or "channel" is formed by the packets – that match the filter expression. – – This filter mechanism allows the creation of an arbitrary – logical expression with which to filter packets. Each – filter associated with a channel is OR'ed with the others. – Within a filter, any bits checked in the data and status are – AND'ed with respect to other bits in the same filter. The – NotMask also allows for checking for inequality. Finally, – the channelAcceptType object allows for inversion of the – whole equation. – – If a management station wishes to receive a trap to alert it – that new packets have been captured and are available for – download, it is recommended that it set up an alarm entry that – monitors the value of the relevant channelMatches instance. – – The channel can be turned on or off, and can also – generate events when packets pass through it.

filterTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF FilterEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of packet filter entries."
   ::= { filter 1 }

filterEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     FilterEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A set of parameters for a packet filter applied on a
       particular interface.  As an example, an instance of the
       filterPktData object might be named filterPktData.12"
   INDEX { filterIndex }
   ::= { filterTable 1 }

FilterEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   filterIndex                 Integer32,
   filterChannelIndex          Integer32,
   filterPktDataOffset         Integer32,

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 64] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   filterPktData               OCTET STRING,
   filterPktDataMask           OCTET STRING,
   filterPktDataNotMask        OCTET STRING,
   filterPktStatus             Integer32,
   filterPktStatusMask         Integer32,
   filterPktStatusNotMask      Integer32,
   filterOwner                 OwnerString,
   filterStatus                EntryStatus

}

filterIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry
       in the filter table.  Each such entry defines
       one filter that is to be applied to every packet
       received on an interface."
   ::= { filterEntry 1 }

filterChannelIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "This object identifies the channel of which this filter
       is a part.  The filters identified by a particular value
       of this object are associated with the same channel as
       identified by the same value of the channelIndex object."
   ::= { filterEntry 2 }

filterPktDataOffset OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The offset from the beginning of each packet where
       a match of packet data will be attempted.  This offset
       is measured from the point in the physical layer
       packet after the framing bits, if any.  For example,
       in an Ethernet frame, this point is at the beginning of
       the destination MAC address.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       filterStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   DEFVAL { 0 }

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 65] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   ::= { filterEntry 3 }

filterPktData OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The data that is to be matched with the input packet.
       For each packet received, this filter and the accompanying
       filterPktDataMask and filterPktDataNotMask will be
       adjusted for the offset.  The only bits relevant to this
       match algorithm are those that have the corresponding
       filterPktDataMask bit equal to one.  The following three
       rules are then applied to every packet:
       (1) If the packet is too short and does not have data
           corresponding to part of the filterPktData, the packet
           will fail this data match.
       (2) For each relevant bit from the packet with the
           corresponding filterPktDataNotMask bit set to zero, if
           the bit from the packet is not equal to the corresponding
           bit from the filterPktData, then the packet will fail
           this data match.
       (3) If for every relevant bit from the packet with the
           corresponding filterPktDataNotMask bit set to one, the
           bit from the packet is equal to the corresponding bit
           from the filterPktData, then the packet will fail this
           data match.
       Any packets that have not failed any of the three matches
       above have passed this data match.  In particular, a zero
       length filter will match any packet.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       filterStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { filterEntry 4 }

filterPktDataMask OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The mask that is applied to the match process.
       After adjusting this mask for the offset, only those
       bits in the received packet that correspond to bits set
       in this mask are relevant for further processing by the

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 66] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       match algorithm.  The offset is applied to filterPktDataMask
       in the same way it is applied to the filter.  For the
       purposes of the matching algorithm, if the associated
       filterPktData object is longer than this mask, this mask is
       conceptually extended with '1' bits until it reaches the
       length of the filterPktData object.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       filterStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { filterEntry 5 }

filterPktDataNotMask OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The inversion mask that is applied to the match
       process.  After adjusting this mask for the offset,
       those relevant bits in the received packet that correspond
       to bits cleared in this mask must all be equal to their
       corresponding bits in the filterPktData object for the packet
       to be accepted.  In addition, at least one of those relevant
       bits in the received packet that correspond to bits set in
       this mask must be different to its corresponding bit in the
       filterPktData object.
       For the purposes of the matching algorithm, if the associated
       filterPktData object is longer than this mask, this mask is
       conceptually extended with '0' bits until it reaches the
       length of the filterPktData object.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       filterStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { filterEntry 6 }

filterPktStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status that is to be matched with the input packet.
       The only bits relevant to this match algorithm are those that
       have the corresponding filterPktStatusMask bit equal to one.
       The following two rules are then applied to every packet:
       (1) For each relevant bit from the packet status with the
           corresponding filterPktStatusNotMask bit set to zero, if
           the bit from the packet status is not equal to the

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 67] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

           corresponding bit from the filterPktStatus, then the
           packet will fail this status match.
       (2) If for every relevant bit from the packet status with the
           corresponding filterPktStatusNotMask bit set to one, the
           bit from the packet status is equal to the corresponding
           bit from the filterPktStatus, then the packet will fail
           this status match.
       Any packets that have not failed either of the two matches
       above have passed this status match.  In particular, a zero
       length status filter will match any packet's status.
       The value of the packet status is a sum.  This sum
       initially takes the value zero.  Then, for each
       error, E, that has been discovered in this packet,
       2 raised to a value representing E is added to the sum.
       The errors and the bits that represent them are dependent
       on the media type of the interface that this channel
       is receiving packets from.
       The errors defined for a packet captured off of an
       Ethernet interface are as follows:
           bit #    Error
               0    Packet is longer than 1518 octets
               1    Packet is shorter than 64 octets
               2    Packet experienced a CRC or Alignment error
       For example, an Ethernet fragment would have a
       value of 6 (2^1 + 2^2).
       As this MIB is expanded to new media types, this object
       will have other media-specific errors defined.
       For the purposes of this status matching algorithm, if the
       packet status is longer than this filterPktStatus object,
       this object is conceptually extended with '0' bits until it
       reaches the size of the packet status.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       filterStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { filterEntry 7 }

filterPktStatusMask OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 68] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   DESCRIPTION
       "The mask that is applied to the status match process.
       Only those bits in the received packet that correspond to
       bits set in this mask are relevant for further processing
       by the status match algorithm.  For the purposes
       of the matching algorithm, if the associated filterPktStatus
       object is longer than this mask, this mask is conceptually
       extended with '1' bits until it reaches the size of the
       filterPktStatus.  In addition, if a packet status is longer
       than this mask, this mask is conceptually extended with '0'
       bits until it reaches the size of the packet status.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       filterStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { filterEntry 8 }

filterPktStatusNotMask OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The inversion mask that is applied to the status match
       process.  Those relevant bits in the received packet status
       that correspond to bits cleared in this mask must all be
       equal to their corresponding bits in the filterPktStatus
       object for the packet to be accepted.  In addition, at least
       one of those relevant bits in the received packet status
       that correspond to bits set in this mask must be different
       to its corresponding bit in the filterPktStatus object for
       the packet to be accepted.
       For the purposes of the matching algorithm, if the associated
       filterPktStatus object or a packet status is longer than this
       mask, this mask is conceptually extended with '0' bits until
       it reaches the longer of the lengths of the filterPktStatus
       object and the packet status.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       filterStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { filterEntry 9 }

filterOwner OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OwnerString
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The entity that configured this entry and is therefore
       using the resources assigned to it."

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 69] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   ::= { filterEntry 10 }

filterStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EntryStatus
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of this filter entry."
   ::= { filterEntry 11 }

channelTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF ChannelEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of packet channel entries."
   ::= { filter 2 }

channelEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     ChannelEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A set of parameters for a packet channel applied on a
       particular interface.  As an example, an instance of the
       channelMatches object might be named channelMatches.3"
   INDEX { channelIndex }
   ::= { channelTable 1 }

ChannelEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   channelIndex                 Integer32,
   channelIfIndex               Integer32,
   channelAcceptType            INTEGER,
   channelDataControl           INTEGER,
   channelTurnOnEventIndex      Integer32,
   channelTurnOffEventIndex     Integer32,
   channelEventIndex            Integer32,
   channelEventStatus           INTEGER,
   channelMatches               Counter32,
   channelDescription           DisplayString,
   channelOwner                 OwnerString,
   channelStatus                EntryStatus

}

channelIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 70] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry in the channel
       table.  Each such entry defines one channel, a logical
       data and event stream.
       It is suggested that before creating a channel, an
       application should scan all instances of the
       filterChannelIndex object to make sure that there are no
       pre-existing filters that would be inadvertently be linked
       to the channel."
   ::= { channelEntry 1 }

channelIfIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of this object uniquely identifies the
       interface on this remote network monitoring device to which
       the associated filters are applied to allow data into this
       channel.  The interface identified by a particular value
       of this object is the same interface as identified by the
       same value of the ifIndex object, defined in RFC 2233 [17].
       The filters in this group are applied to all packets on
       the local network segment attached to the identified
       interface.
       An agent may or may not be able to tell if fundamental
       changes to the media of the interface have occurred and
       necessitate an invalidation of this entry.  For example, a
       hot-pluggable ethernet card could be pulled out and replaced
       by a token-ring card.  In such a case, if the agent has such
       knowledge of the change, it is recommended that it
       invalidate this entry.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       channelStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { channelEntry 2 }

channelAcceptType OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     INTEGER {
                acceptMatched(1),
                acceptFailed(2)
              }
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 71] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       "This object controls the action of the filters
       associated with this channel.  If this object is equal
       to acceptMatched(1), packets will be accepted to this
       channel if they are accepted by both the packet data and
       packet status matches of an associated filter.  If
       this object is equal to acceptFailed(2), packets will
       be accepted to this channel only if they fail either
       the packet data match or the packet status match of
       each of the associated filters.
       In particular, a channel with no associated filters will
       match no packets if set to acceptMatched(1) case and will
       match all packets in the acceptFailed(2) case.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       channelStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { channelEntry 3 }

channelDataControl OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     INTEGER {
                on(1),
                off(2)
              }
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "This object controls the flow of data through this channel.
       If this object is on(1), data, status and events flow
       through this channel.  If this object is off(2), data,
       status and events will not flow through this channel."
   DEFVAL { off }
   ::= { channelEntry 4 }

channelTurnOnEventIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (0..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of this object identifies the event
       that is configured to turn the associated
       channelDataControl from off to on when the event is
       generated.  The event identified by a particular value
       of this object is the same event as identified by the
       same value of the eventIndex object.  If there is no
       corresponding entry in the eventTable, then no
       association exists.  In fact, if no event is intended
       for this channel, channelTurnOnEventIndex must be
       set to zero, a non-existent event index.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 72] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       This object may not be modified if the associated
       channelStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { channelEntry 5 }

channelTurnOffEventIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (0..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of this object identifies the event
       that is configured to turn the associated
       channelDataControl from on to off when the event is
       generated.  The event identified by a particular value
       of this object is the same event as identified by the
       same value of the eventIndex object.  If there is no
       corresponding entry in the eventTable, then no
       association exists.  In fact, if no event is intended
       for this channel, channelTurnOffEventIndex must be
       set to zero, a non-existent event index.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       channelStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { channelEntry 6 }

channelEventIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (0..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of this object identifies the event
       that is configured to be generated when the
       associated channelDataControl is on and a packet
       is matched.  The event identified by a particular value
       of this object is the same event as identified by the
       same value of the eventIndex object.  If there is no
       corresponding entry in the eventTable, then no
       association exists.  In fact, if no event is intended
       for this channel, channelEventIndex must be
       set to zero, a non-existent event index.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       channelStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { channelEntry 7 }

channelEventStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     INTEGER {
                eventReady(1),
                eventFired(2),

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 73] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

                eventAlwaysReady(3)
              }
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The event status of this channel.
       If this channel is configured to generate events
       when packets are matched, a means of controlling
       the flow of those events is often needed.  When
       this object is equal to eventReady(1), a single
       event may be generated, after which this object
       will be set by the probe to eventFired(2).  While
       in the eventFired(2) state, no events will be
       generated until the object is modified to
       eventReady(1) (or eventAlwaysReady(3)).  The
       management station can thus easily respond to a
       notification of an event by re-enabling this object.
       If the management station wishes to disable this
       flow control and allow events to be generated
       at will, this object may be set to
       eventAlwaysReady(3).  Disabling the flow control
       is discouraged as it can result in high network
       traffic or other performance problems."
   DEFVAL { eventReady }
   ::= { channelEntry 8 }

channelMatches OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Counter32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of times this channel has matched a packet.
       Note that this object is updated even when
       channelDataControl is set to off."
   ::= { channelEntry 9 }

channelDescription OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     DisplayString (SIZE (0..127))
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A comment describing this channel."
   ::= { channelEntry 10 }

channelOwner OBJECT-TYPE

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 74] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   SYNTAX     OwnerString
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The entity that configured this entry and is therefore
       using the resources assigned to it."
   ::= { channelEntry 11 }

channelStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EntryStatus
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of this channel entry."
   ::= { channelEntry 12 }

– The Packet Capture Group

– Implementation of the Packet Capture group is optional. The Packet – Capture Group requires implementation of the Filter Group. – Consult the MODULE-COMPLIANCE macro for the authoritative – conformance information for this MIB. – – The Packet Capture group allows packets to be captured – upon a filter match. The bufferControlTable controls – the captured packets output from a channel that is – associated with it. The captured packets are placed – in entries in the captureBufferTable. These entries are – associated with the bufferControlEntry on whose behalf they – were stored.

bufferControlTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF BufferControlEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of buffers control entries."
   ::= { capture 1 }

bufferControlEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     BufferControlEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A set of parameters that control the collection of a stream
       of packets that have matched filters.  As an example, an
       instance of the bufferControlCaptureSliceSize object might
       be named bufferControlCaptureSliceSize.3"

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 75] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   INDEX { bufferControlIndex }
   ::= { bufferControlTable 1 }

BufferControlEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   bufferControlIndex                Integer32,
   bufferControlChannelIndex         Integer32,
   bufferControlFullStatus           INTEGER,
   bufferControlFullAction           INTEGER,
   bufferControlCaptureSliceSize     Integer32,
   bufferControlDownloadSliceSize    Integer32,
   bufferControlDownloadOffset       Integer32,
   bufferControlMaxOctetsRequested   Integer32,
   bufferControlMaxOctetsGranted     Integer32,
   bufferControlCapturedPackets      Integer32,
   bufferControlTurnOnTime           TimeTicks,
   bufferControlOwner                OwnerString,
   bufferControlStatus               EntryStatus

}

bufferControlIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry
       in the bufferControl table.  The value of this
       index shall never be zero.  Each such
       entry defines one set of packets that is
       captured and controlled by one or more filters."
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 1 }

bufferControlChannelIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that identifies the channel that is the
       source of packets for this bufferControl table.
       The channel identified by a particular value of this
       index is the same as identified by the same value of
       the channelIndex object.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       bufferControlStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 2 }

bufferControlFullStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     INTEGER {

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 76] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

                spaceAvailable(1),
                full(2)
              }
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "This object shows whether the buffer has room to
       accept new packets or if it is full.
       If the status is spaceAvailable(1), the buffer is
       accepting new packets normally.  If the status is
       full(2) and the associated bufferControlFullAction
       object is wrapWhenFull, the buffer is accepting new
       packets by deleting enough of the oldest packets
       to make room for new ones as they arrive.  Otherwise,
       if the status is full(2) and the
       bufferControlFullAction object is lockWhenFull,
       then the buffer has stopped collecting packets.
       When this object is set to full(2) the probe must
       not later set it to spaceAvailable(1) except in the
       case of a significant gain in resources such as
       an increase of bufferControlOctetsGranted.  In
       particular, the wrap-mode action of deleting old
       packets to make room for newly arrived packets
       must not affect the value of this object."
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 3 }

bufferControlFullAction OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     INTEGER {
                lockWhenFull(1),
                wrapWhenFull(2)    -- FIFO
              }
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "Controls the action of the buffer when it
       reaches the full status.  When in the lockWhenFull(1)
       state and a packet is added to the buffer that
       fills the buffer, the bufferControlFullStatus will
       be set to full(2) and this buffer will stop capturing
       packets."
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 4 }

bufferControlCaptureSliceSize OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-create

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 77] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The maximum number of octets of each packet
       that will be saved in this capture buffer.
       For example, if a 1500 octet packet is received by
       the probe and this object is set to 500, then only
       500 octets of the packet will be stored in the
       associated capture buffer.  If this variable is set
       to 0, the capture buffer will save as many octets
       as is possible.
       This object may not be modified if the associated
       bufferControlStatus object is equal to valid(1)."
   DEFVAL { 100 }
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 5 }

bufferControlDownloadSliceSize OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The maximum number of octets of each packet
       in this capture buffer that will be returned in
       an SNMP retrieval of that packet.  For example,
       if 500 octets of a packet have been stored in the
       associated capture buffer, the associated
       bufferControlDownloadOffset is 0, and this
       object is set to 100, then the captureBufferPacket
       object that contains the packet will contain only
       the first 100 octets of the packet.
       A prudent manager will take into account possible
       interoperability or fragmentation problems that may
       occur if the download slice size is set too large.
       In particular, conformant SNMP implementations are not
       required to accept messages whose length exceeds 484
       octets, although they are encouraged to support larger
       datagrams whenever feasible."
   DEFVAL { 100 }
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 6 }

bufferControlDownloadOffset OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 78] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       "The offset of the first octet of each packet
       in this capture buffer that will be returned in
       an SNMP retrieval of that packet.  For example,
       if 500 octets of a packet have been stored in the
       associated capture buffer and this object is set to
       100, then the captureBufferPacket object that
       contains the packet will contain bytes starting
       100 octets into the packet."
   DEFVAL { 0 }
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 7 }

bufferControlMaxOctetsRequested OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The requested maximum number of octets to be
       saved in this captureBuffer, including any
       implementation-specific overhead. If this variable
       is set to -1, the capture buffer will save as many
       octets as is possible.
       When this object is created or modified, the probe
       should set bufferControlMaxOctetsGranted as closely
       to this object as is possible for the particular probe
       implementation and available resources.  However, if
       the object has the special value of -1, the probe
       must set bufferControlMaxOctetsGranted to -1."
   DEFVAL { -1 }
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 8 }

bufferControlMaxOctetsGranted OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The maximum number of octets that can be
       saved in this captureBuffer, including overhead.
       If this variable is -1, the capture buffer will save
       as many octets as possible.
       When the bufferControlMaxOctetsRequested object is
       created or modified, the probe should set this object
       as closely to the requested value as is possible for the
       particular probe implementation and available resources.
       However, if the request object has the special value

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 79] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       of -1, the probe must set this object to -1.
       The probe must not lower this value except as a result of
       a modification to the associated
       bufferControlMaxOctetsRequested object.
       When this maximum number of octets is reached
       and a new packet is to be added to this
       capture buffer and the corresponding
       bufferControlFullAction is set to wrapWhenFull(2),
       enough of the oldest packets associated with this
       capture buffer shall be deleted by the agent so
       that the new packet can be added.  If the corresponding
       bufferControlFullAction is set to lockWhenFull(1),
       the new packet shall be discarded.  In either case,
       the probe must set bufferControlFullStatus to
       full(2).
       When the value of this object changes to a value less
       than the current value, entries are deleted from
       the captureBufferTable associated with this
       bufferControlEntry.  Enough of the
       oldest of these captureBufferEntries shall be
       deleted by the agent so that the number of octets
       used remains less than or equal to the new value of
       this object.
       When the value of this object changes to a value greater
       than the current value, the number of associated
       captureBufferEntries may be allowed to grow."
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 9 }

bufferControlCapturedPackets OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Packets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of packets currently in this captureBuffer."
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 10 }

bufferControlTurnOnTime OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     TimeTicks
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of sysUpTime when this capture buffer was
       first turned on."

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 80] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   ::= { bufferControlEntry 11 }

bufferControlOwner OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OwnerString
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The entity that configured this entry and is therefore
       using the resources assigned to it."
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 12 }

bufferControlStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EntryStatus
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of this buffer Control Entry."
   ::= { bufferControlEntry 13 }

captureBufferTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF CaptureBufferEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of packets captured off of a channel."
   ::= { capture 2 }

captureBufferEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     CaptureBufferEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A packet captured off of an attached network.  As an
       example, an instance of the captureBufferPacketData
       object might be named captureBufferPacketData.3.1783"
   INDEX { captureBufferControlIndex, captureBufferIndex }
   ::= { captureBufferTable 1 }

CaptureBufferEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   captureBufferControlIndex   Integer32,
   captureBufferIndex          Integer32,
   captureBufferPacketID       Integer32,
   captureBufferPacketData     OCTET STRING,
   captureBufferPacketLength   Integer32,
   captureBufferPacketTime     Integer32,
   captureBufferPacketStatus   Integer32

}

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 81] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

captureBufferControlIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The index of the bufferControlEntry with which
       this packet is associated."
   ::= { captureBufferEntry 1 }

captureBufferIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..2147483647)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry
       in the captureBuffer table associated with a
       particular bufferControlEntry.  This index will
       start at 1 and increase by one for each new packet
       added with the same captureBufferControlIndex.
       Should this value reach 2147483647, the next packet
       added with the same captureBufferControlIndex shall
       cause this value to wrap around to 1."
   ::= { captureBufferEntry 2 }

captureBufferPacketID OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that describes the order of packets
       that are received on a particular interface.
       The packetID of a packet captured on an
       interface is defined to be greater than the
       packetID's of all packets captured previously on
       the same interface.  As the captureBufferPacketID
       object has a maximum positive value of 2^31 - 1,
       any captureBufferPacketID object shall have the
       value of the associated packet's packetID mod 2^31."
   ::= { captureBufferEntry 3 }

captureBufferPacketData OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The data inside the packet, starting at the beginning
       of the packet plus any offset specified in the

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 82] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       associated bufferControlDownloadOffset, including any
       link level headers.  The length of the data in this object
       is the minimum of the length of the captured packet minus
       the offset, the length of the associated
       bufferControlCaptureSliceSize minus the offset, and the
       associated bufferControlDownloadSliceSize.  If this minimum
       is less than zero, this object shall have a length of zero."
   ::= { captureBufferEntry 4 }

captureBufferPacketLength OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Octets"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The actual length (off the wire) of the packet stored
       in this entry, including FCS octets."
   ::= { captureBufferEntry 5 }

captureBufferPacketTime OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   UNITS      "Milliseconds"
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The number of milliseconds that had passed since
       this capture buffer was first turned on when this
       packet was captured."
   ::= { captureBufferEntry 6 }

captureBufferPacketStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A value which indicates the error status of this packet.
       The value of this object is defined in the same way as
       filterPktStatus.  The value is a sum.  This sum
       initially takes the value zero.  Then, for each
       error, E, that has been discovered in this packet,
       2 raised to a value representing E is added to the sum.
       The errors defined for a packet captured off of an
       Ethernet interface are as follows:
           bit #    Error
               0    Packet is longer than 1518 octets

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 83] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

               1    Packet is shorter than 64 octets
               2    Packet experienced a CRC or Alignment error
               3    First packet in this capture buffer after
                    it was detected that some packets were
                    not processed correctly.
               4    Packet's order in buffer is only approximate
                    (May only be set for packets sent from
                    the probe)
       For example, an Ethernet fragment would have a
       value of 6 (2^1 + 2^2).
       As this MIB is expanded to new media types, this object
       will have other media-specific errors defined."
   ::= { captureBufferEntry 7 }

– The Event Group

– Implementation of the Event group is optional. – Consult the MODULE-COMPLIANCE macro for the authoritative – conformance information for this MIB. – – The Event group controls the generation and notification – of events from this device. Each entry in the eventTable – describes the parameters of the event that can be triggered. – Each event entry is fired by an associated condition located – elsewhere in the MIB. An event entry may also be associated – with a function elsewhere in the MIB that will be executed – when the event is generated. For example, a channel may – be turned on or off by the firing of an event. – – Each eventEntry may optionally specify that a log entry – be created on its behalf whenever the event occurs. – Each entry may also specify that notification should – occur by way of SNMP trap messages. In this case, the – community for the trap message is given in the associated – eventCommunity object. The enterprise and specific trap – fields of the trap are determined by the condition that – triggered the event. Two traps are defined: risingAlarm and – fallingAlarm. If the eventTable is triggered by a condition – specified elsewhere, the enterprise and specific trap fields – must be specified for traps generated for that condition.

eventTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF EventEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 84] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       "A list of events to be generated."
   ::= { event 1 }

eventEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EventEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A set of parameters that describe an event to be generated
       when certain conditions are met.  As an example, an instance
       of the eventLastTimeSent object might be named
       eventLastTimeSent.6"
   INDEX { eventIndex }
   ::= { eventTable 1 }

EventEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   eventIndex          Integer32,
   eventDescription    DisplayString,
   eventType           INTEGER,
   eventCommunity      OCTET STRING,
   eventLastTimeSent   TimeTicks,
   eventOwner          OwnerString,
   eventStatus         EntryStatus

}

eventIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry in the
       event table.  Each such entry defines one event that
       is to be generated when the appropriate conditions
       occur."
   ::= { eventEntry 1 }

eventDescription OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     DisplayString (SIZE (0..127))
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A comment describing this event entry."
   ::= { eventEntry 2 }

eventType OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     INTEGER {
                none(1),
                log(2),

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 85] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

                snmptrap(3),    -- send an SNMP trap
                logandtrap(4)
              }
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The type of notification that the probe will make
       about this event.  In the case of log, an entry is
       made in the log table for each event.  In the case of
       snmp-trap, an SNMP trap is sent to one or more
       management stations."
   ::= { eventEntry 3 }

eventCommunity OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OCTET STRING (SIZE (0..127))
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "If an SNMP trap is to be sent, it will be sent to
       the SNMP community specified by this octet string."
   ::= { eventEntry 4 }

eventLastTimeSent OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     TimeTicks
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of sysUpTime at the time this event
       entry last generated an event.  If this entry has
       not generated any events, this value will be
       zero."
   ::= { eventEntry 5 }

eventOwner OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     OwnerString
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The entity that configured this entry and is therefore
       using the resources assigned to it.
       If this object contains a string starting with 'monitor'
       and has associated entries in the log table, all connected
       management stations should retrieve those log entries,
       as they may have significance to all management stations
       connected to this device"
   ::= { eventEntry 6 }

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 86] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

eventStatus OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     EntryStatus
   MAX-ACCESS read-create
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The status of this event entry.
       If this object is not equal to valid(1), all associated
       log entries shall be deleted by the agent."
   ::= { eventEntry 7 }

– logTable OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     SEQUENCE OF LogEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A list of events that have been logged."
   ::= { event 2 }

logEntry OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     LogEntry
   MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "A set of data describing an event that has been
       logged.  For example, an instance of the logDescription
       object might be named logDescription.6.47"
   INDEX { logEventIndex, logIndex }
   ::= { logTable 1 }

LogEntry ::= SEQUENCE {

   logEventIndex           Integer32,
   logIndex                Integer32,
   logTime                 TimeTicks,
   logDescription          DisplayString

}

logEventIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..65535)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The event entry that generated this log
       entry.  The log identified by a particular
       value of this index is associated with the same
       eventEntry as identified by the same value
       of eventIndex."

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 87] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   ::= { logEntry 1 }

logIndex OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     Integer32 (1..2147483647)
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An index that uniquely identifies an entry
       in the log table amongst those generated by the
       same eventEntries.  These indexes are
       assigned beginning with 1 and increase by one
       with each new log entry.  The association
       between values of logIndex and logEntries
       is fixed for the lifetime of each logEntry.
       The agent may choose to delete the oldest
       instances of logEntry as required because of
       lack of memory.  It is an implementation-specific
       matter as to when this deletion may occur."
   ::= { logEntry 2 }

logTime OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     TimeTicks
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The value of sysUpTime when this log entry was created."
   ::= { logEntry 3 }

logDescription OBJECT-TYPE

   SYNTAX     DisplayString (SIZE (0..255))
   MAX-ACCESS read-only
   STATUS     current
   DESCRIPTION
       "An implementation dependent description of the
       event that activated this log entry."
   ::= { logEntry 4 }

– Remote Network Monitoring Traps

rmonEventsV2 OBJECT-IDENTITY

   STATUS      current
   DESCRIPTION "Definition point for RMON notifications."
   ::= { rmon 0 }

risingAlarm NOTIFICATION-TYPE

   OBJECTS  { alarmIndex, alarmVariable, alarmSampleType,
              alarmValue, alarmRisingThreshold }
   STATUS   current

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 88] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

   DESCRIPTION
       "The SNMP trap that is generated when an alarm
       entry crosses its rising threshold and generates
       an event that is configured for sending SNMP
       traps."
   ::= { rmonEventsV2 1 }

fallingAlarm NOTIFICATION-TYPE

   OBJECTS { alarmIndex, alarmVariable, alarmSampleType,
             alarmValue, alarmFallingThreshold }
   STATUS    current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The SNMP trap that is generated when an alarm
       entry crosses its falling threshold and generates
       an event that is configured for sending SNMP
       traps."
   ::= { rmonEventsV2 2 }

– Conformance information

rmonCompliances OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmonConformance 9 } rmonGroups OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { rmonConformance 10 }

– Compliance Statements rmonCompliance MODULE-COMPLIANCE

   STATUS current
   DESCRIPTION
       "The requirements for conformance to the RMON MIB. At least
       one of the groups in this module must be implemented to
       conform to the RMON MIB. Implementations of this MIB
       must also implement the system group of MIB-II [16] and the
       IF-MIB [17]."
   MODULE -- this module
     GROUP rmonEtherStatsGroup
         DESCRIPTION
             "The RMON Ethernet Statistics Group is optional."
     GROUP rmonHistoryControlGroup
         DESCRIPTION
             "The RMON History Control Group is optional."
     GROUP rmonEthernetHistoryGroup
         DESCRIPTION
             "The RMON Ethernet History Group is optional."
     GROUP rmonAlarmGroup
         DESCRIPTION

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 89] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

             "The RMON Alarm Group is optional."
     GROUP rmonHostGroup
         DESCRIPTION
             "The RMON Host Group is mandatory when the
             rmonHostTopNGroup is implemented."
     GROUP rmonHostTopNGroup
         DESCRIPTION
             "The RMON Host Top N Group is optional."
     GROUP rmonMatrixGroup
         DESCRIPTION
             "The RMON Matrix Group is optional."
     GROUP rmonFilterGroup
         DESCRIPTION
             "The RMON Filter Group is mandatory when the
             rmonPacketCaptureGroup is implemented."
     GROUP rmonPacketCaptureGroup
         DESCRIPTION
             "The RMON Packet Capture Group is optional."
     GROUP rmonEventGroup
         DESCRIPTION
             "The RMON Event Group is mandatory when the
             rmonAlarmGroup is implemented."
   ::= { rmonCompliances 1 }
   rmonEtherStatsGroup OBJECT-GROUP
       OBJECTS {
           etherStatsIndex, etherStatsDataSource,
           etherStatsDropEvents, etherStatsOctets, etherStatsPkts,
           etherStatsBroadcastPkts, etherStatsMulticastPkts,
           etherStatsCRCAlignErrors, etherStatsUndersizePkts,
           etherStatsOversizePkts, etherStatsFragments,
           etherStatsJabbers, etherStatsCollisions,
           etherStatsPkts64Octets, etherStatsPkts65to127Octets,
           etherStatsPkts128to255Octets,
           etherStatsPkts256to511Octets,
           etherStatsPkts512to1023Octets,
           etherStatsPkts1024to1518Octets,
           etherStatsOwner, etherStatsStatus
       }
       STATUS current
       DESCRIPTION
           "The RMON Ethernet Statistics Group."

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 90] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

       ::= { rmonGroups 1 }
   rmonHistoryControlGroup OBJECT-GROUP
       OBJECTS {
           historyControlIndex, historyControlDataSource,
           historyControlBucketsRequested,
           historyControlBucketsGranted, historyControlInterval,
           historyControlOwner, historyControlStatus
       }
       STATUS current
       DESCRIPTION
           "The RMON History Control Group."
       ::= { rmonGroups 2 }
   rmonEthernetHistoryGroup OBJECT-GROUP
       OBJECTS {
           etherHistoryIndex, etherHistorySampleIndex,
           etherHistoryIntervalStart, etherHistoryDropEvents,
           etherHistoryOctets, etherHistoryPkts,
           etherHistoryBroadcastPkts, etherHistoryMulticastPkts,
           etherHistoryCRCAlignErrors, etherHistoryUndersizePkts,
           etherHistoryOversizePkts, etherHistoryFragments,
           etherHistoryJabbers, etherHistoryCollisions,
           etherHistoryUtilization
       }
       STATUS current
       DESCRIPTION
           "The RMON Ethernet History Group."
       ::= { rmonGroups 3 }
   rmonAlarmGroup OBJECT-GROUP
       OBJECTS {
           alarmIndex, alarmInterval, alarmVariable,
           alarmSampleType, alarmValue, alarmStartupAlarm,
           alarmRisingThreshold, alarmFallingThreshold,
           alarmRisingEventIndex, alarmFallingEventIndex,
           alarmOwner, alarmStatus
       }
       STATUS current
       DESCRIPTION
           "The RMON Alarm Group."
       ::= { rmonGroups 4 }
   rmonHostGroup OBJECT-GROUP
       OBJECTS {
           hostControlIndex, hostControlDataSource,
           hostControlTableSize, hostControlLastDeleteTime,
           hostControlOwner, hostControlStatus,

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 91] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

           hostAddress, hostCreationOrder, hostIndex,
           hostInPkts, hostOutPkts, hostInOctets,
           hostOutOctets, hostOutErrors, hostOutBroadcastPkts,
           hostOutMulticastPkts, hostTimeAddress,
           hostTimeCreationOrder, hostTimeIndex,
           hostTimeInPkts, hostTimeOutPkts, hostTimeInOctets,
           hostTimeOutOctets, hostTimeOutErrors,
           hostTimeOutBroadcastPkts, hostTimeOutMulticastPkts
       }
       STATUS current
       DESCRIPTION
           "The RMON Host Group."
       ::= { rmonGroups 5 }
   rmonHostTopNGroup OBJECT-GROUP
       OBJECTS {
           hostTopNControlIndex, hostTopNHostIndex,
           hostTopNRateBase, hostTopNTimeRemaining,
           hostTopNDuration, hostTopNRequestedSize,
           hostTopNGrantedSize, hostTopNStartTime,
           hostTopNOwner, hostTopNStatus,
           hostTopNReport, hostTopNIndex,
           hostTopNAddress, hostTopNRate
       }
       STATUS current
       DESCRIPTION
           "The RMON Host Top 'N' Group."
       ::= { rmonGroups 6 }
   rmonMatrixGroup OBJECT-GROUP
       OBJECTS {
           matrixControlIndex, matrixControlDataSource,
           matrixControlTableSize, matrixControlLastDeleteTime,
           matrixControlOwner, matrixControlStatus,
           matrixSDSourceAddress, matrixSDDestAddress,
           matrixSDIndex, matrixSDPkts,
           matrixSDOctets, matrixSDErrors,
           matrixDSSourceAddress, matrixDSDestAddress,
           matrixDSIndex, matrixDSPkts,
           matrixDSOctets, matrixDSErrors
       }
       STATUS current
       DESCRIPTION
           "The RMON Matrix Group."
       ::= { rmonGroups 7 }
   rmonFilterGroup OBJECT-GROUP
       OBJECTS {

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 92] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

           filterIndex, filterChannelIndex, filterPktDataOffset,
           filterPktData, filterPktDataMask,
           filterPktDataNotMask, filterPktStatus,
           filterPktStatusMask, filterPktStatusNotMask,
           filterOwner, filterStatus,
           channelIndex, channelIfIndex, channelAcceptType,
           channelDataControl, channelTurnOnEventIndex,
           channelTurnOffEventIndex, channelEventIndex,
           channelEventStatus, channelMatches,
           channelDescription, channelOwner, channelStatus
       }
       STATUS current
       DESCRIPTION
           "The RMON Filter Group."
       ::= { rmonGroups 8 }
   rmonPacketCaptureGroup OBJECT-GROUP
       OBJECTS {
           bufferControlIndex, bufferControlChannelIndex,
           bufferControlFullStatus, bufferControlFullAction,
           bufferControlCaptureSliceSize,
           bufferControlDownloadSliceSize,
           bufferControlDownloadOffset,
           bufferControlMaxOctetsRequested,
           bufferControlMaxOctetsGranted,
           bufferControlCapturedPackets,
           bufferControlTurnOnTime,
           bufferControlOwner, bufferControlStatus,
           captureBufferControlIndex, captureBufferIndex,
           captureBufferPacketID, captureBufferPacketData,
           captureBufferPacketLength, captureBufferPacketTime,
           captureBufferPacketStatus
       }
       STATUS current
       DESCRIPTION
           "The RMON Packet Capture Group."
       ::= { rmonGroups 9 }
   rmonEventGroup OBJECT-GROUP
       OBJECTS {
           eventIndex, eventDescription, eventType,
           eventCommunity, eventLastTimeSent,
           eventOwner, eventStatus,
           logEventIndex, logIndex, logTime,
           logDescription
       }
       STATUS current
       DESCRIPTION

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 93] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

           "The RMON Event Group."
       ::= { rmonGroups 10 }
   rmonNotificationGroup NOTIFICATION-GROUP
       NOTIFICATIONS { risingAlarm, fallingAlarm }
       STATUS        current
       DESCRIPTION
           "The RMON Notification Group."
       ::= { rmonGroups 11 }

END

6. Security Considerations

 In order to implement this MIB, a probe must capture all packets on
 the locally-attached network, including packets between third
 parties.  These packets are analyzed to collect network addresses,
 protocol usage information, and conversation statistics. Data of this
 nature may be considered sensitive in some environments. In such
 environments the administrator may wish to restrict SNMP access to
 the probe.
 This MIB also includes functions for returning the contents of
 captured packets, potentially including sensitive user data or
 passwords. It is recommended that SNMP access to these functions be
 restricted.
 There are a number of management objects defined in this MIB that
 have a MAX-ACCESS clause of read-write and/or read-create.  Such
 objects may be considered sensitive or vulnerable in some network
 environments.  The support for SET operations in a non-secure
 environment without proper protection can have a negative effect on
 network operations.
 SNMPv1 by itself is not a secure environment.  Even if the network
 itself is secure (for example by using IPSec), even then, there is no
 control as to who on the secure network is allowed to access and
 GET/SET (read/change/create/delete) the objects in this MIB.
 It is recommended that the implementors consider the security
 features as provided by the SNMPv3 framework.  Specifically, the use
 of the User-based Security Model RFC 2574 [12] and the View-based
 Access Control Model RFC 2575 [15] is recommended.
 It is then a customer/user responsibility to ensure that the SNMP
 entity giving access to an instance of this MIB, is properly
 configured to give access to the objects only to those principals
 (users) that have legitimate rights to indeed GET or SET
 (change/create/delete) them.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 94] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

7. Acknowledgments

 This document was produced by the IETF Remote Network Monitoring
 Working Group.

8. Author's Address

 Steve Waldbusser
 Phone: +1-650-948-6500
 Fax:   +1-650-745-0671
 Email: waldbusser@nextbeacon.com

9. References

 [1]  Harrington, D., Presuhn, R., and B. Wijnen, "An Architecture for
      Describing SNMP Management Frameworks", RFC 2571, April 1999.
 [2]  Rose, M. and K. McCloghrie, "Structure and Identification of
      Management Information for TCP/IP-based Internets", STD 16, RFC
      1155, May 1990.
 [3]  Rose, M. and K. McCloghrie, "Concise MIB Definitions", STD 16,
      RFC 1212, March 1991.
 [4]  Rose, M., "A Convention for Defining Traps for use with the
      SNMP", RFC 1215, March 1991.
 [5]  McCloghrie, K., Perkins, D., Schoenwaelder, J., Case, J., Rose,
      M. and S. Waldbusser, "Structure of Management Information
      Version 2 (SMIv2)", STD 58, RFC 2578, April 1999.
 [6]  McCloghrie, K., Perkins, D., Schoenwaelder, J., Case, J., Rose,
      M. and S. Waldbusser, "Textual Conventions for SMIv2", STD 58,
      RFC 2579, April 1999.
 [7]  McCloghrie, K., Perkins, D., Schoenwaelder, J., Case, J., Rose,
      M. and S. Waldbusser, "Conformance Statements for SMIv2", STD
      58, RFC 2580, April 1999.
 [8]  Case, J., Fedor, M., Schoffstall, M. and J. Davin, "Simple
      Network Management Protocol", STD 15, RFC 1157, May 1990.
 [9]  Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M. and S. Waldbusser,
      "Introduction to Community-based SNMPv2", RFC 1901, January
      1996.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 95] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

 [10] Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M. and S. Waldbusser, "Transport
      Mappings for Version 2 of the Simple Network Management Protocol
      (SNMPv2)", RFC 1906, January 1996.
 [11] Case, J., Harrington D., Presuhn R. and B. Wijnen, "Message
      Processing and Dispatching for the Simple Network Management
      Protocol (SNMP)", RFC 2572, April 1999.
 [12] Blumenthal, U. and B. Wijnen, "User-based Security Model (USM)
      for version 3 of the Simple Network Management Protocol
      (SNMPv3)", RFC 2574, April 1999.
 [13] Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M. and S. Waldbusser, "Protocol
      Operations for Version 2 of the Simple Network Management
      Protocol (SNMPv2)", RFC 1905, January 1996.
 [14] Levi, D., Meyer, P. and B. Stewart, "SNMPv3 Applications", RFC
      2573, April 1999.
 [15] Wijnen, B., Presuhn, R. and K. McCloghrie, "View-based Access
      Control Model (VACM) for the Simple Network Management Protocol
      (SNMP)", RFC 2575, April 1999.
 [16] McCloghrie, K. and M. Rose, Editors, "Management Information
      Base for Network Management of TCP/IP-based internets: MIB-II",
      STD 17, RFC 1213, March 1991.
 [17] McCloghrie, K. and F. Kastenholz, "The Interfaces Group MIB
      using SMIv2", RFC 2233, November 1997.
 [18] Waldbusser, S., "Remote Network Monitoring MIB", RFC 1757,
      February 1995.
 [19] Waldbusser, S., "Token Ring Extensions to the Remote Network
      Monitoring MIB", RFC 1513, September 1993.
 [20] Waldbusser, S., "Remote Network Monitoring Management
      Information Base Version 2 using SMIv2", RFC 2021, January 1997.
 [21] Waterman, R., Lahaye, B., Romascanu, D. and S.  Waldbusser,
      "Remote Network Monitoring MIB Extensions for Switched Networks
      Version 1.0", RFC 2613, June 1999.
 [22] Case, J., Mundy, R., Partain, D. and B. Stewart, "Introduction
      to Version 3 of the Internet-standard Network Management
      Framework", RFC 2570, April 1999.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 96] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

10. Intellectual Property

 The IETF takes no position regarding the validity or scope of any
 intellectual property or other rights that might be claimed to
 pertain to the implementation or use of the technology described in
 this document or the extent to which any license under such rights
 might or might not be available; neither does it represent that it
 has made any effort to identify any such rights.  Information on the
 IETF's procedures with respect to rights in standards-track and
 standards-related documentation can be found in BCP-11.  Copies of
 claims of rights made available for publication and any assurances of
 licenses to be made available, or the result of an attempt made to
 obtain a general license or permission for the use of such
 proprietary rights by implementors or users of this specification can
 be obtained from the IETF Secretariat.
 The IETF invites any interested party to bring to its attention any
 copyrights, patents or patent applications, or other proprietary
 rights which may cover technology that may be required to practice
 this standard.  Please address the information to the IETF Executive
 Director.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 97] RFC 2819 Remote Network Monitoring MIB May 2000

11. Full Copyright Statement

 Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000).  All Rights Reserved.
 This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to
 others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it
 or assist in its implementation may be prepared, copied, published
 and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any
 kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are
 included on all such copies and derivative works.  However, this
 document itself may not be modified in any way, such as by removing
 the copyright notice or references to the Internet Society or other
 Internet organizations, except as needed for the purpose of
 developing Internet standards in which case the procedures for
 copyrights defined in the Internet Standards process must be
 followed, or as required to translate it into languages other than
 English.
 The limited permissions granted above are perpetual and will not be
 revoked by the Internet Society or its successors or assigns.
 This document and the information contained herein is provided on an
 "AS IS" basis and THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET ENGINEERING
 TASK FORCE DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING
 BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION
 HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
 MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Acknowledgement

 Funding for the RFC Editor function is currently provided by the
 Internet Society.

Waldbusser Standards Track [Page 98]

/data/webs/external/dokuwiki/data/pages/rfc/rfc2819.txt · Last modified: 2000/06/01 22:22 (external edit)